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    Vincennes University
   
 
  Nov 20, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018 Vincennes University Catalog

University Core Curriculum



General Education Definition

General Education at Vincennes University focuses on two distinct but interrelated educational components. Each component is essential to ensure development of measurable basic skills, critical and creative thinking skills, and a breadth of knowledge needed both to strengthen students’ work in their major and to achieve the levels of understanding expected of all college graduates. The first component of general education at V.U. is basic skills. The purpose of this study is to ensure that students read, write, speak, and compute at a college level. These skills are necessary, not only for the communication and computation crucial to a successful life after completion of a degree, but also for the active and successful participation in the pursuit of a degree. Basic skills will be enhanced as students progress through the remainder of their course work, and especially as they complete general education’s second component, liberal education. The purpose of this study is to actualize the students’ potential to live fuller lives as individuals and as members of different social institutions. This course work provides the opportunity for students to develop an appreciation of humanity’s varied responses to life lived in the natural world, both as an individual and as a part of society. As a consequence of this study, students should achieve a better understanding of the world and people around them, and should thus be able to live a fuller and more participatory life.

Vincennes University General and Liberal Education Outcomes

The University Core Curriculum (UCC) is an integral component of the learning process at Vincennes University. The UCC encompasses learning outcomes that the faculty of Vincennes University have established as a minimum expectation of students graduating from Vincennes University. The UCC Outcomes along with the Indiana Statewide Transfer General Education Outcomes describe the knowledge, skills, abilities, and attitudes students should demonstrate upon program completion. These courses help prepare our students for future careers and educational pursuits.

The first two outcomes below represent “UCC Basic Skills” outcomes and the final three represent “UCC Liberal Education” outcomes.

Students who successfully complete the UCC will be able to:
• Engage in articulate expression through critical reading and effective written, oral, and digital communication.
• Apply quantitative reasoning and a variety of numeric data to solve problems in a variety of disciplines.
• Evaluate ethical behavior as an individual and as a member of local and global communities.
• Apply critical and creative thinking skills to solve problems.
• Integrate knowledge and perspectives of different disciplines to answer complex questions.

UCC Basic Skills Competency Criteria

  • Writing competency: students must complete ENGL 101 English Composition I or ENGL 112 Rhetoric and Research with at least a C.
  • Oral Communication competency: students must complete COMM 143 Introduction to Public Speaking or COMM 148 Interpersonal Communication with at least a C.
  • Mathematics competency: students must complete MATH 102 College Algebra or MATH 103 Mathematics and Its Applications or higher level MATH course with at least a C; OR students must complete MATT 100-level or higher level MATT course with at least a C.

Indiana Statewide Transfer General Education Outcomes/
Vincennes University Core Curriculum Outcomes

1. Written Communication
1.1. Produce texts that use appropriate formats, genre conventions, and documentation
styles while controlling tone, syntax, grammar, and spelling.
1.2. Demonstrate an understanding of writing as a social process that includes multiple
drafts, collaboration, and reflection.
1.3. Read critically, summarize, apply, analyze, and synthesize information and concepts
in written and visual texts as the basis for developing original ideas and claims.
1.4. Demonstrate an understanding of writing assignments as a series of tasks including
Identifying and evaluating useful and reliable outside sources.
1.5. Develop, assert and support a focused thesis with appropriate reasoning and adequate evidence.
1.6. Compose texts that exhibit appropriate rhetorical choices, which include attention to
audience, purpose, context, genre, and convention.
1.7. Demonstrate proficiency in reading, evaluating, analyzing, and using material collected from electronic sources (such as visual,              electronic, library databases, Internet sources, other official databases, federal government databases, reputable blogs, wikis, etc.).

2. Speaking and Listening
2.1. Use appropriate organization or logical sequencing to deliver an oral message.
2.2. Adapt an oral message for diverse audiences, contexts, and communication channels.
2.3. Identify and demonstrate appropriate oral and nonverbal communication practices.
2.4. Advance an oral argument using logical reasoning.
2.5. Provide credible and relevant evidence to support an oral argument.
2.6. Demonstrate the ethical responsibilities of sending and receiving oral messages.
2.7. Summarize or paraphrase an oral message to demonstrate comprehension.

3. Quantitative Reasoning
3.1. Interpret information that has been presented in mathematical form (e.g. with
functions, equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words, geometric figures).
3.2. Represent information/data in mathematical form as appropriate (e.g. with functions,
equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words, geometric figures).
3.3. Demonstrate skill in carrying out mathematical (e.g. algebraic, geometric, logical, statistical) procedures flexibly, accurately, and efficiently to solve problems.
3.4. Analyze mathematical arguments, determining whether stated conclusions can be inferred.
3.5. Communicate which assumptions have been made in the solution process.
3.6. Analyze mathematical results in order to determine the reasonableness of the solution.
3.7. Cite the limitations of the process where applicable.
3.8. Clearly explain the representation, solution, and interpretation of the math problem.

4. Scientific Ways of Knowing
4.1. Explain how scientific explanations are formulated, tested, and modified or
validated.
4.2. Distinguish between scientific and non‐scientific evidence and explanations.
4.3. Apply foundational knowledge and discipline‐specific concepts to address issues
or solve problems.
4.4. Apply basic observational, quantitative, or technological methods to gather
data and generate evidence‐based conclusions.
4.5. Use current models and theories to describe, explain, or predict natural phenomena.
4.6. Locate reliable sources of scientific evidence to construct arguments related to real world issues.

5. Social and Behavioral Ways of Knowing
5.1. Demonstrate knowledge of major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical
patterns, or historical contexts within a given social or behavioral domain.
5.2. Identify the strengths and weaknesses of contending explanations or interpretations for social, behavioral, or historical phenomena.
5.3. Demonstrate basic literacy in social, behavioral, or historical research methods and
analyses.
5.4. Evaluate evidence supporting conclusions about the behavior of individuals,
groups, institutions, or organizations.
5.5. Recognize the extent and impact of diversity among individuals, cultures, or
societies in contemporary or historical contexts.
5.6. Identify examples of how social, behavioral, or historical knowledge informs and can shape personal, ethical, civic, or global decisions and responsibilities.

6. Humanistic and Artistic Ways of Knowing
6.1. Recognize and describe humanistic, historical, or artistic works or problems and
patterns of the human experience.
6.2. Apply disciplinary methodologies, epistemologies, and traditions of the humanities
and the arts, including the ability to distinguish primary and secondary sources.
6.3. Analyze and evaluate texts, objects, events, or ideas in their cultural, intellectual or historical contexts
6.4. Analyze the concepts and principles of various types of humanistic or artistic
expression.
6.5. Create, interpret, or reinterpret artistic and/or humanistic works through
performance or criticism.
6.6. Develop arguments about forms of human agency or expression grounded in rational
analysis and in an understanding of and respect for spatial, temporal, and cultural
contexts.
6.7. Analyze diverse narratives and evidence in order to explore the complexity of
human experience across space and time.

Students completing the UCC requirements for the AS-Transfer, AA, BS, or BA degree have fulfilled the requirements of the Statewide Transfer General Education Core. This completion will be documented on the student’s official transcript. If that student subsequently transfers to another state educational institution, the receiving institution will accept that documentation as satisfying their own Statewide Transfer General Education Core requirements. Furthermore, the receiving institution will apply toward satisfying the transfer student’s degree requirements at least 30 credit hours of transfer credit. To note: Successful completion of the Statewide Transfer General Education Core requirements is not a guarantee of admission to a particular state educational institution. The Statewide Transfer General Education Core does not add to, subtract from, or change any requirements for a major. Students need to work closely with an advisor to determine what relationship, if any, exists between requirements for general education and requirements for a specific major. This is a most important issue and should be carefully noted.

University Core Curriculum Models


The University Core Curriculum includes courses designed to develop a common set of competencies for all students pursuing a baccalaureate or associate degree. Students are required to demonstrate competence in all of the core areas as a condition of fulfilling the requirements for the A.A. or A.S. and the B.A. or B.S. degrees. Students are not exempt from University Core requirements based on national standardized aptitude test scores (SAT, ACT) or placement exam scores, such as CPT, COMPASS, or ASSET.

  AS-Career/Tech AS-Transfer AA BS BA
           
  24 UCC Credit Hours
- see specific course notations for UCC elective options that are “ASCT only”
30 Credit Hours
-all from UCC List of Courses
36 Credit Hours
-all from UCC List of Courses
40 Credit Hours
-all from UCC List of Courses
48 Credit Hours
-all from UCC List of Courses
Composition
 
3 3 3 3  3

Math
 

3

3

3

3

3

Speech
 
3 3 3 3 3
Lab Science 4 4 4 4 (Physical or Biological Science/Lab)
and
3 (Physical or Biological Science)
4 (Physical or Biological Science/Lab)
and
3 (Physical or Biological Science)
Social Science
 
3 3 6 3 6
Humanities
 
0 3 6 3 6
Writing
 
0 3 3 3 3
Foreign Language
 
0 0 8 0 8 at the 200-Level in the same language
Social Science
Math
Science
Humanities
Writing
Fitness/Wellness*
*(AS-Career Tech only)
8 8   6  
Human Issues and Dilemmas 300-Level       3 3
Diverse Cultures/Global Perspectives 0 0 0 3 3
Senior Capstone
 
0 0 0 3 3

 

Human Issues and Dilemmas Course Requirement


Human Issues and Dilemmas Courses are 300-level Humanities and Values; Social Sciences and History; or Biological and Physical Sciences courses intended to advance students’ abilities to understand and address the complexities of human life. The courses will actively engage students in discussion and treatment of the dilemmas that arise when issues are considered from multidisciplinary perspectives. The courses will empower students to create knowledge and meaning by identifying issues, synthesizing various perspectives, and determining solutions to dilemmas through both individual evaluation of problems and collaborative efforts with others. As such, these courses will enhance students’ critical thinking, information management, writing, speaking, and collaboration skills.

Capstone Experience Requirement


The Capstone Experience (XXXX 490, Capstone Experience) is a three-credit hour course intended to synthesize and integrate the knowledge and skills of the major course work and the University Core Curriculum course work. Students will be required to complete a major research project aimed at addressing a philosophic, social, political, economic, or historical problem connected to their major field of study. Activities in the course will include a major research paper and an oral presentation based on significant research and project results. These activities will be opportunities for students to display the content knowledge, research skills, critical thinking, affective learning, and presentation skills needed to be life-long learners.

University Core Course Lists


Mathematics


Sciences


Laboratory Science


Social Science


Humanities


Fitness/Wellness


Reading, Writing, and Speaking Intensive Requirements


All B.A., B.S., A.A., A.S. and A.S.C.T. programs at Vincennes University include writing-reading (WR), and speaking (S) intensive courses. They are designated within the course descriptions and programs. The writing-reading and speaking intensive requirements for graduation are met under the following conditions:

  • the student must demonstrate college level proficiency in reading;
  • the student must complete all intensive course assignments and receive a C or better in an intensive course; and
  • the student who transfers into a B.A./B.S. program must complete the Capstone course with a C or better.

It is required that students complete or be concurrently enrolled in benchmark courses before an intensive course is taken:

  • ENGL 101  or ENGL 112  completed before a Writing-Reading (WR) intensive course
  • COMM 143  or COMM 148  completed before a Speaking (S) intensive course
     

I.  READING

  1. In order to demonstrate college level proficiency in reading, the student should:
    1. summarize material accurately and concisely;
    2. interpret subject matter literally and inferentially;
    3. seek and acquire vocabulary through reading; and
    4. seek and understand subject matter pertinent to his or her career.
  2. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Reading for the A.A., A.S., and ASCT Core:

Each student who is a candidate for the A.A., A.S., or A.S.C.T. degree must demonstrate achievement in reading by satisfying the conditions of either Criterion No. 1, or Criterion No. 2.

  1. The conditions of Criterion No. 1 are:
    1. Placement scores require no developmental/remedial reading upon initial matriculation
  2. The conditions of Criterion No. 2 are:
    1. Placement scores require developmental/remedial reading upon initial placement; and
    2. Earn a C or better in READ 009 , READ 011 , READ 103 , OR READ 104  and demonstrate college level reading on a standardized reading test

If and only if, the student has attempted and failed to satisfy the conditions of Criterion No. 1 or No. 2, and student chooses not to repeat those steps, he or she may demonstrate advanced college level reading proficiency by achieving a CPT Reading score of 84 or higher prior to graduation.
 

II.  WRITING

  1.  In order to demonstrate college-level proficiency in writing, the student should:
    1. write a document showing a clear purpose, effective organization, adequate supporting details, and using a mechanically correct style;
    2. critically analyze and evaluate his or her own and others’ writing;
    3. appropriately incorporate ideas from outside sources into his or her own words with proper credit given;
    4. be able to write a personal resume.
  2. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Writing for the A.A. and A.S. Transfer Core:

Each student who is a candidate for either the A.A. or A.S. degree must demonstrate achievement in writing by satisfying the conditions of Criterion No. 1. If the student fails to meet these conditions, he/she may then attempt to meet the conditions of Criterion No. 2.

  1. The conditions of Criterion No. 1 are:
    1. Earn a C or better in ENGL 101  and
    2. Earn a passing grade in one of the following: ENGL 102 , ENGL 107 , ENGL 108 , ENGL 109 , or ENGL 205  and
    3. Earn a C or better in a course approved and designated as a Writing-Reading Intensive course.
      - or -
    4. Earn a C or better in ENGL 112  and
    5. Earn a C or better in a course approved and designated as a Writing-Reading Intensive course.
  2. The conditions of Criterion No. 2 may be met if and only if a student has attempted, but not completed Criterion No. 1 successfully. Criterion No. 2 is as follows: If the student has failed to earn a C or better in any of the approved Writing-Reading Intensive courses in his or her major or in the liberal education core and chooses not to repeat that approach, then, prior to graduation, the student must pass a writing test administered by the English Department.

   C. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Writing for the A.S.C.T. Core:

1. Each student who is a candidate for the A.S.C.T. degree must demonstrate achievement in writing by meeting the following criteria:

  1. Earn a C or better in ENGL 101  or ENGL 112 , and
  2. Earn a C or better in an approved Writing-Reading Intensive course either in his or her major or the liberal education core, or
  3. If the student fails to earn a C or better in an approved Writing-Reading Intensive course and chooses not to attempt that approach again, then the student must, prior to graduation, pass a writing test administered by the English Department.

    D. Criteria for Approval as a Writing-Reading Intensive Course:

1. While it is assumed that students will most often select a Writing-Reading Intensive course within their majors, courses identified as meeting the Liberal Education component may also qualify as Writing-Reading Intensive. For a course to be designated as a Writing-Reading Intensive course, the following criteria must be met:

a. The course uses writing as one of its tools to promote the learning of course materials.

b. Assignments involving writing should be given throughout the semester and regular feedback given to the students on ways to improve their writing. At least one of the writing assignments should require a rough draft submitted for comment and returned before the final draft is expected.

c. It is assumed that instructors will identify, in their syllabi, writing objectives such as the type of writing expected, the number of writing assignments, and the percentage of the grade to be determined by each writing assignment. Individual writing assignments may vary in scope and length according to the needs of the major or the course. The type of assignment should be determined by the type of writing required for success in advanced study or in the profession. Research papers, summaries, essay exams, lab reports, journals, and other appropriate writing forms may all be used. A minimum of 2000 words, exclusive of rough drafts, for the entire course is expected. At least one writing assignment must require students to use and document sources in their writing.

d. Writing, as described in D.1.c, above, should be a significant part of the overall course grade. “Significant” is intended to mean one of the following options: (1) Written work will determine at least thirty percent of the course grade. (2) If written work will count some percentage less than thirty percent, then with revisions, all written work must achieve a passing grade. In the case of option 2, failure to complete writing assignments with an average grade of C or higher will result in failure of the course.

e. Instructors will provide students with criteria used to evaluate their writing. Such criteria must reflect the standards of the profession or discipline.

f. Instructors will provide assistance to students to help them with their writing - and/or direct them to the resources available on campus to provide additional assistance. This assistance might include the following: sample papers that meet the requirement; group activities that give students feedback on their writing; requiring outlines or rough drafts that are returned with comments before the paper is completed; tutorials in the lab; and individual conferences.

 
III. SPEAKING

  1. In order to demonstrate college-level proficiency in speaking, the student should:
    1. Use appropriate organization or logical sequencing, including an introduction, body, and conclusion, to deliver an oral presentation;
    2. Use verbal and nonverbal communication appropriate to the diverse audiences and contexts for the course being taught;
    3. Actively listen and critically evaluate an oral message;
    4. Provide credible and relevant evidence to support an oral argument.
  2. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Speaking for the A.A., A.S., or A.S.C.T. Core:

Each student who is a candidate for the A.A., A.S., or A.S.C.T. degree must demonstrate achievement in speaking by satisfying the conditions of Criterion No. 1 and Criterion No. 2.

  1. The conditions of Criterion No. 1 are: Earn a C or better in COMM 143  or COMM 148 
  2. The conditions of Criterion No. 2 are: Earn a C or better in an approved Speaking Intensive course.

If, and only if, the student has attempted and failed to meet the conditions of Criterion 2 and chooses not to attempt that approach again, then prior to graduation, the student must pass at a seventy percent level, the Speech Comprehension tests administered by the Communication Department and deliver and receive a C or better on a 7-10 minute informative speech on a topic directly related to his/her major area of study.

   C. Criteria for Approval as a Speaking Intensive Course

  1. It is preferred that students select a Speaking Intensive course within their majors; however, courses identified as meeting the Liberal Education component may also qualify as Speaking Intensive.  A Speaking Intensive course reinforces the speaking skills beyond the normal classroom discussion.  For a course to be designated as a Speaking Intensive course, the following criteria must be met:

a. The course uses speaking as one of its tools to promote learning of course materials.

b. A minimum of one structured speech assignment must be used that requires students to present prepared material in front of an audience.

c. The total speaking time for one or a combination of multiple speeches will be a minimum of 7-10 minutes.

d. The structured presentation(s) will be evaluated in the following ways:

1.      Having a clear organization, with an introduction, body, and

         conclusion. 

2.      Presenting main points in a logical manner.

3.      Supporting claims with documented evidence from outside sources.

4.      Delivering the speech using appropriate speaking styles that suit the message, purpose, and context.

5.      Using nonverbal cues which are appropriate to the verbal message.

e. Instructors will provide students with criteria used to evaluate their speaking.

f. The speaking assignment(s) will determine at least 10 percent of the course grade.


IV. MATHEMATICS

  1. In order to demonstrate Mathematics proficiency, the student should be able to:
    1. apply a combination of fundamental arithmetic and algebra skills,
    2. apply fundamental geometric spatial skills, and
    3. solve problems using the appropriate skills identified above in both rote and novel situations.
  2. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Mathematics for the A.A. or A.S. Transfer Degrees:
    Each student who is a candidate for either the A.A. or A.S. degree must demonstrate achievement in mathematics by earning a C or better in one 100-level or higher MATH course.
  3. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Mathematics for the A.S. Career/Tech Degree:
    Each student who is a candidate for the A.S.C.T. degree must demonstrate achievement in mathematics by earning a C or better in one 100-level or higher MATH or MATT course, or earning a C or better in MATA 104, 105, and 106.