May 05, 2021  
2019-2020 Vincennes University Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Vincennes University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM

The course numbering system is alpha-numeric, consisting of four letters and three numbers. The letters indicate the subject area of the course. Developmental courses have a zero as the initial digit. Freshman level courses carry numbers between 100 and 199. Sophomore courses are numbered 200 to 299. Junior and senior level courses carry numbers between 300 and 499.

Speaking and Writing Reading Intensive courses are indicated in the course description section of this catalog.

Listing for Special Instruction Courses. Vincennes University offers instruction tailored to the needs of special populations. The instruction is individualized to the particular needs of the business or industry, with emphasis that the content be college level. The following courses are established to permit flexibility within established credit hour designations.

 

Office Administration

  
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    OADM 230 - Medical Insurance Billing


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Students will develop a basic knowledge of the creation of a health insurance claim form (CMS-1500) for reimbursement from insurance companies. Students will learn about Commercial Insurance, Blue Cross/Blue Shield, and Medicare insurance billing rules and regulations as well as how to fill out a CMS-1500 claim form on each one of these insurance carriers. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in OADM 170 ; and a grade of C or better or concurrent enrollment in OADM 175 .
  
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    OADM 231 - Advanced Medical Insurance Billing


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will introduce our students to the world of electronic healthcare. Allscripts PM (Practice Management) and Allscripts EHR (Electronic Health Record) will be utilized to give the students hands-on training. Allscripts PM is practice management software utilized in medical practices to register patients, schedule appointments, enter charges, and post payments. Allscripts EHR is utilized in medical practices as the electronic medical record and the main focus will be on teaching the students how to function as a medical scribe. Scribes are individuals trained in medical documentation who assist a medical provider throughout his or her shift. They serve as a personal assistant to the provider to help make them more efficient and productive. The primary function of a scribe is the creation and maintenance of the patient’s medical record, which is done under the supervision of the provider. The scribe will document the patient’s story, the provider’s interaction with the patient, the procedures performed, the results of laboratory studies, and other pertinent information. This is accomplished by using a laptop or tablet computer, which the scribe takes with him or her throughout the shift. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in OADM 230 .
  
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    OADM 232 - Presentation Software


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Students will learn how to plan, define, create and modify presentations working with text and objects. Individuals will create an on-screen slide show using the latest presentation software, video graphics and sound. A lab fee will be assessed to students so they can sit for the MOUS exam. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

  
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    OADM 233 - Spreadsheets


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course is designed to include creating and formatting worksheets, using formulas and basic functions, creating charts, and printing professional- looking worksheets. The use of spreadsheets to produce reports, the sorting and searching of records, the design of macros, and the use of what-if, combining files, and the extraction of data from a file will be presented. A lab fee will be assessed to students so they can sit for the MOUS exam. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): None; however, previous computer experience is helpful.
  
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    OADM 234 - Databases


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course is designed to include guidelines on designing tables and databases, defining a relationship between two tables, changing, adding, or deleting records, creating queries, sorting and filtering data in a query, and preparing forms and informative reports. The use of relational databases, more advanced uses of queries, customizing forms and reports, integrating with other programs and automating tasks with macros will be covered. A lab fee will be assessed to students so they can sit for the MOUS exam. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): None; however, previous computer experience is helpful.
  
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    OADM 235 - Legal Transcription


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    Students will develop machine transcription skills in a variety of legal documents, such as those used in real estate, litigation, wills and estates, negligence, and family law by utilizing word processing software. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A passing grade in OADM 161  and OADM 215 .
  
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    OADM 260 - Office Management


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Provides students with a basic background in modern theory and practice in office organization and management including such topics as management styles, problem solving, communication, ergonomics, office design, equipment, space, and personnel. Students will complete outside reading assignments, give oral presentations in class, and work on group projects containing written and oral components. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
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    OADM 266 - Professional Business Image


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course is open to all majors. Individual personal and professional development will be enhanced by this course. Some of the topics to be covered include greetings and introductions, professional dress, restaurant etiquette, table manners, meeting manners, travel and international etiquette. Students will also gain instruction in time management, communication, organizational, and leadership skills. Students will be required to attend an evening dinner session. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    OADM 267 - Office Technology Seminar


    1 hr (Sem II)
    The emphasis in this course is to provide a capstone experience for the ‘graduate-to-be’ and a general assessment of the prospective secretarial graduate’s skill level as he/she nears completion of his/her program.  The student will be expected to take the Office Proficiency Assessment Certification (OPAC) exam.  Students will develop a portfolio of their work including a resume and letter of application. 1 lecture/laboratory hour.

    Prerequisite(s): A passing grade in or concurrent enrollment in OADM 161 , OADM 210 , OADM 232 , OADM 233 , and OADM 234 .
  
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    OADM 290 - Virtual Assistant Seminar


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    The Virtual Assistant is a course designed to assist those wanting to utilize their administrative assistant skills while working from a home office or an off-site office. The VA performs duties for a variety of companies at the same time. Upon completion of this course the student should be ready to create their home-based business. Some of the topics to be covered include: the necessary skills to succeed, services to offer, the correct business entity, naming your business, setting up your home office, marketing your business, defining your clients, determining rates to charge, writing a contract, establishing a web presence, and working efficiently. Students will be able to become associated with the International Virtual Assistants Association that offers the IVAA Certified VA Exam. 3 lecture hours.


Paralegal

  
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    PARA 100 - Paralegal Profession and Ethics


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    An introduction to the paralegal profession with in-depth coverage of the ethics of the legal profession with emphasis on the paralegal. The course features the use of case method, covering the reading, analysis and application of legal rules as developed through case law. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    PARA 130 - Land Transactions


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    An exploration of property concepts, trusts and future interests. Creation of land interests by various instruments, stressing the role of the legal assistant in land transactions. Also covered are various court actions involving land transactions (such as patrician, ejectment, liens, foreclosures), abstracts, title opinions and insurance. Heavy emphasis is placed on drafting of documents and pleadings involving land transactions. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    PARA 140 - Criminal Law and Procedure


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course provides background in criminal law and procedures from the legal professional’s perspective as opposed to a law enforcement perspective. The substantive law portion covers criminal common law and criminal code law, the Constitutional limitations on criminal laws, and the elements necessary to convict a person of a crime. The procedural law portion covers Constitutional requirements for search and seizure, interrogation, identification procedures and right to counsel, as well as other elements of due process. Also arraignment, trial procedures and punishment will be addressed. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    PARA 150 - Investigation and Tort Law


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Emphasizes legal assistant’s role in client representation in tort claims matters including field investigation techniques; tort litigation, pre-trial and trial procedures; and comprehension of fundamentals substantive tort law and remedies, both federal and state. Utilizes practicum exercises. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    PARA 160 - Civil Procedures


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Study of the aspects of the legal assistant’s supportive role from case preparation to final disposition, pretrial and trial procedure, pleadings, rules of courts, motions, and discovery in civil proceedings. Basic concepts of trial evidence including relevance, hearsay and exhibits will be covered. Emphasis is on Indiana and Federal rules of court and rules of evidence. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    PARA 170 - The Paralegal in the Business World


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    An in-depth examination of the law of agency and contracts (including an introduction to the Uniform Commercial Code) as well as various forms of business. Emphasizes the paralegal’s role in the business and corporate setting, including creation, maintenance, and dissolution, along with drafting and research assignments in their areas. Securities regulations are also covered as it relates to the typical corporation and its investors. An introduction to administrative law and insurance as it relates to the business world. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    PARA 180 - Law Office Management


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    An in depth course in the efficient functioning of a law office. Students will learn current principles of law office management and use both basic office software (word processing, spreadsheet, and database) and specialized legal software (document preparation, case management, and calendaring/time-keeping). 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

  
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    PARA 210 - Evidence and Litigation


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    A description of the nature, types and use of evidence at trial. An analysis of rules of evidence bearing on its admissibility. The role of the legal assistant is stressed through practice in developing and preparing a persuasive case at trial, including summarizing depositions, writing trial briefs, preparing exhibits, selecting juries, etc. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    PARA 215 - Legal Research and Writing


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course is designed to develop students’ research skills by use of essential legal research tools, including statutes, cases, digests, Shepard’s Citations, and computerized legal research. Students will acquire analytical skills in categorizing sources of law and applying law to fact situations. Students will learn how to communicate their research and analysis in proper written formats for use in law offices and in courts. 2 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

    Writing Reading Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ENGL 101 .
  
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    PARA 220 - Probate Law


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course is designed to teach students to understand basic concepts of probate and non-probate transfers of property rights that occur at the death of an owner. Students will learn property concepts such as tenancies in common, joint tenancies, and tenancies by the entirety, as well as the basics of future interests and inheritance law. Students will learn the basics of trusts and wills and the use of trusts and wills in estate planning. Students will learn the basic procedures to administer and close a decedent’s estate, including rudimentary principles of death taxes. Students will acquire skills to prepare a simple trust, a simple will, and basic administration and tax forms. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    PARA 230 - Family Law


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    A study of the common aspects of family law: marriage, parent and child, dissolution, property division, child custody and support, and adoption. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    PARA 240 - Debtor-Creditor and Bankruptcy Law


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Study of the substantive law of the debtor-creditor relationship and the substantive law of bankruptcy. Study of the practice and procedures with respect to debtor-creditor and bankruptcy law. Emphasis is given to drafting and preparation of pleadings, instruments, documents, forms, and memoranda associated with the practice of debtor-creditor and bankruptcy law. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    PARA 270 - Legal Internship


    1-3 hrs (Sem I, II, Summer)
    Internship for interested and qualified students in a law office or an approved law-related office. Supervised by program chair and lawyer in whose office the internship is served. First-hand experience in the legal system. Written report from students required as well as an evaluation from the supervising lawyer. Students will acquire 45 practicum hours for one (1) college credit; 90 practicum hours for two (2) college credits; 135 practicum hours for three (3) college credits.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of B or better in PARA 215 , and a B average or better in all first year legal assistant courses.
  
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    PARA 290 - Research/Professional Seminar


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This is an advanced research and writing course conducted on a seminar basis. Emphasis will be given to the area of Elder Law and various state and federal remedies in law and equity; also federal constitutional and statutory issues such as discrimination, civil rights, or other contemporary issues. Emphasis will also be placed on professionalism and assembling professional resume and portfolio. 3 lecture hours.

    Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in PARA 215 ; and a grade of C or better in COMM 143  or COMM 148 .

Persian

  
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    PERS 100 - Basic Conversational Persian (Farsi)


    2 hrs (Offered on Demand)
    This course provides an introduction to basic vocabulary, language structures, and cultural information needed for communication while traveling in Iran and other Farsi-speaking regions. Emphasis is on oral communication and culture. Offered only at military sites.  2 class hours.


Physical Fitness/Wellness

  
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    PFWL 100 - Lifetime Fitness/Wellness


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    The study of the fundamental concepts, principles, and components of fitness/wellness. Related areas of study include, but are not limited to, nutrition, stress reduction, heart health, body composition and weight control, and substance abuse. Course will be delivered through a one-hour lecture and two one-hour lab sessions per week. Students will select a lab activity of their choice. 1 lecture hour, 2 laboratory hours.

  
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    PFWL 112 - Fitness/Wellness for Law and Safety Professions


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    The study of the fundamental concepts, principles, and components of fitness/wellness, specifically as it relates to the law and safety professions. Related areas of study include, but are not limited to, nutrition, stress reductions, heart health, body composition and weight control, and substance abuse. Course will be delivered through a combination of lecture and activity sessions. Activities will be designed around the physical fitness requirements of the law and safety professions. 3 class hours.

  
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    PFWL 115 - Concepts in Wellness


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Study of fundamental concepts, principles, and components of wellness. Course will examine patterns of exercise, diet, nutrition, stress reduction, fitness attitudes, heart health, substance abuse, and other issues of health and wellness. 1 lecture hour.


Physical Education

  
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    PHED 104 - Strength Training


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Basic instruction in the use of weights and weight machines for the purpose of developing muscular strength. Instruction will also be given relative to the development of a personalized strength training program. 2 class activity hours.

  
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    PHED 109 - Racquet Games


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Basic instruction in rules, terminology, and basic skills in badminton, racquet ball, and pickle ball. 2 class activity hours.

  
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    PHED 110 - Tennis


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Basic instruction in the fundamental skills, rules, strategy, and terminology of tennis. Course designed for beginning tennis students. 2 class activity hours.

  
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    PHED 112 - Golf


    1 hr (Sem II)
    Basic instruction in the skills, rules and etiquette of golf. Designed for beginning golfers. Not open to Physical Education majors. 2 class activity hours.

  
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    PHED 113 - Soccer


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Fundamentals, skills, strategy, and terminology of soccer. Course designed for beginning soccer students. 2 class activity hours.

  
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    PHED 118 - Beginning Swimming


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Basic instruction in swimming. 2 class activity hours.

  
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    PHED 119 - Intermediate Swimming


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    For those students beyond the beginning swimming level. Students successfully completing the course will receive the Red Cross Intermediate Swimming certificate. (Students must be recommended by the instructor.) 2 class activity hours.

  
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    PHED 121 - Lifeguard Training


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    The test includes treading water with the legs only for three minutes, recovering a submerged object in deep water, and swimming a total of 500 meters using crawl, breast, and sidestrokes. The lifeguard training course focuses on the job of the lifeguard in a swimming pool environment, emphasizing victim recognition, surveillance, and equipment-based rescue. Students will also receive instruction and certification in First Aid and Professional Rescuer CPR. Successful course completion results in certification through the American Red Cross as a lifeguard. 4 class activity hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A swimming skills test must be successfully completed prior to enrollment in the course.
  
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    PHED 122 - Water Aerobics


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    A water exercise program designed to emphasize cardiovascular fitness as well as tone major muscle groups. Swimming ability is not required as students can adapt the exercise intensity to their own fitness level. 2 class activity hours.

  
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    PHED 123 - Skin and Scuba Diving


    1 hr (Offered on Demand)
    An introduction to skin and scuba diving. Emphasis on safety, avoidance of potential dangers, equipment use, basic snorkel diving, and discussion of certification programs. (A non-certification course.  However, an option to PADI certify may be available after course end, with an additional fee.)  3 class activity hours.

  
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    PHED 126 - Snow Skiing


    1 hr (Sem II)
    Basic instruction in snow skiing and skiing safety. Students will be required to complete course requirements at a ski area approved by VU and fulfill the requirements for total hours of attendance and participation in the sport. 2 class activity hours.

  
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    PHED 131 - Varsity Sports


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Enrollment limited to members of a University recognized varsity team. Athletes may receive one physical education credit during their enrollment at the University. Grades will be assigned by each sport’s respective coach at the completion of that sport’s season.

  
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    PHED 138 - Tennis for Majors


    1 hr (Sem I)
    Fundamental skills, rules, strategy, equipment, terminology, and pedagogy of tennis. 2 class activity hours.

    Prerequisite(s): For Physical Education majors only.
  
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    PHED 141 - Basketball for Majors


    1 hr (Sem I)
    Improvement of basic skill performance, exposure to cognitive elements and introduction of teaching techniques. 2 class activity hours.

    Prerequisite(s): For Physical Education majors only.
  
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    PHED 143 - Golf for Majors


    1 hr (Offered on Demand)
    Improvement of basic skill performance, exposure to cognitive elements and introduction to teaching techniques. 2 class activity hours.

    Prerequisite(s): For Physical Education majors only.
  
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    PHED 144 - Racquet Games for Majors


    1 hr (Sem II)
    Improvement of basic skill performance, exposure to cognitive elements and introduction to teaching techniques. 2 class activity hours.

    Prerequisite(s): For Physical Education majors only.
  
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    PHED 145 - Soccer for Majors


    1 hr (Sem I)
    Improvement of basic skill performance, exposure to cognitive elements and introduction of teaching techniques. 2 class activity hours.

    Prerequisite(s): For Physical Education majors only.
  
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    PHED 146 - Weight Training for Sport and Fitness Conditioning


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Instruction in principles, techniques, safety, nutrition, and program development in weight training for sport and physical fitness conditioning. Various types of free weight and single station machines will be introduced. 2 class activity hours.

    Prerequisite(s): For Physical Education majors only.
  
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    PHED 150 - Introduction to Kinesiology and Sport


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This introductory course is designed to provide students with an overview of both the foundations of kinesiology and sport. Sociological, historical, philosophical foundations, and current issues and trends will be examined.  3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 .
  
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    PHED 210 - Physical Education for the Elementary School


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Fundamental motor development needs of elementary school children with emphasis on teaching methods, organization, equipment, and activities essential to elementary school physical education programs. Provides opportunities to observe and teach young children in structured situations. Includes demonstration and teaching of games, basic skills, rhythms, and other movement activities. Open to Physical Education and Education majors only. 3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 .
  
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    PHED 211 - Introduction to Sports Management


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course introduces a foundational understanding of Sports Management which includes intercollegiate athletics, recreational sports, and professional sports. Special emphasis is placed on career planning, sports management terminology, and an overview of specific skills and courses required for professional preparation in sports management.  3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in PHED 150 ; and students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 .  
  
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    PHED 212 - Introduction to Exercise Science


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course introduces exercise science and human performance, including exercise physiology, sport medicine, sport biomechanics, motor integration and sport-exercise nutrition. Special emphasis will be placed on career planning and an overview of specific skills and courses required for professional preparation in excercise science. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

    Writing Reading Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in PHED 150 ; and students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 .
  
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    PHED 225 - Physical Fitness and Conditioning for Majors


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Introduction to fundamental concepts, principles and components of physical fitness and conditioning. Lecture subjects include strength, flexibility, endurance and aerobic fitness development; weight control and nutrition; hypokinetic disease prevention, body structural integrity, modes of physical fitness activity and protocol for fitness assessment. Two laboratory hours each week are designed for participation in fitness and conditioning activities. 1 lecture hour, 2 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): For Physical Education majors only.
  
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    PHED 230 - Theory of Coaching


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    Designed to acquaint prospective coaches with techniques, theories, and philosophies of sport coaching. Prepares students to deal with generic daily administrative and organizational problems of coaching. May be offered in alternate years. 2 lecture hours.

  
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    PHED 235 - Officiating Team Sports


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Techniques and fundamentals necessary for officiating softball/baseball, volleyball, and basketball. Students may earn IHSAA license in sport of their choice. Practical hours required. 2 lecture hours.

  
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    PHED 240 - Recreational Sports Programming


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    The study of the basic principles for the development, programming, and organization of recreational sports. Students will learn the techniques and procedures for structuring tournaments, facility operations, club, intramural, and extramural sport programming, as well as conducting competitive and non-competitive sports activities. Some practical experiences. 2 lecture hours.

  
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    PHED 251 - Instructional Leadership for Human Movement/Exercise Activity


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    Development of class organization and management skills, instructional techniques and leadership competencies for leaders, teachers, and personal trainers. Includes selection of instructional resources, activity and venue risk management, techniques of movement and exercise, safety protocol for aerobic exercise, weight training and range of motion activities. Arranged practicum required. 1 lecture hour, 2 class activity hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in PHED 212 . Corequisite(s): PHED 270 .
  
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    PHED 252 - Sports and Recreation Areas and Facilities


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    A survey of primary sports and recreation areas and facilities including associated developments such as stadiums, recreation centers, play fields, parks, trails, and maintenance areas. Specific consideration will be given to design and standards concepts, operation, maintenance, scheduling, equipment, supplies, and purchasing procedures. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 .
  
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    PHED 255 - Management of Recreation, Sport and Fitness


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    An overview of basic management functions and the examination of their use in recreation, sport, and fitness delivery systems. Functions include personnel administration and evaluation, public relations, budgeting systems, and risk management. 3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
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    PHED 270 - Exercise Program Development and Evaluation


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Principles, techniques, procedures and equipment necessary for individual fitness assessment, exercise prescription, motivation techniques, progress evaluation and exercise leadership. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

    Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in PHED 212 . Corequisite(s): PHED 251 .
  
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    PHED 271 - Psycho-Socio Aspects of Sport and Exercise


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Identifies and discusses psycho-socio issues of sport and exercise. Investigates myths of sport and exercise as well as the effects upon the individual of competition, media, social pressures, motivation techniques and other phenomena. 3 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in PSYC 142 .
  
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    PHED 294 - Kinesiology


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    The mechanics of motion as applied to the human body. Development of the ability to analyze activity for the purpose of improving physical skills. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in BIOL 111  and BIOL 111L ; and a grade of C or better in or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 112  and BIOL 112L .

Philosophy

  
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    PHIL 111 - Introduction to Philosophy


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course introduces beginning students to the recurring problems, ideas and thought systems as represented in the literature and lives of great thinkers. This course is a transferIN course. 3 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 .
  
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    PHIL 115 - Philosophy through Science Fiction


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    The primary purpose of this course is to develop in the student an understanding of some of the basic themes and concepts of philosophy as they are presented in selections taken from the broad category of science fiction. Storylines from science fiction film and literature will be the impetus for philosophical inquiry.  Topics include artificial intelligence, personal identity and cybernetic enhancements, space travel and time paradoxes, hope and anxieties about technology, utopian and dystopian visions of the future, and the like.  3 class hours.

    Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 
  
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    PHIL 212 - Introduction to Ethics


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course is a study of the morality of human behavior. After discussion of certain introductory questions about the nature and verification of moral propositions, this course will focus on components of the morally good life and alternative theoretical approaches to its achievement, using case studies (civil disobedience, abortion, euthanasia, etc.) to illustrate the principles and norms involved. This course is a transferIN course. 3 class hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
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    PHIL 213 - Logic


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    A course in formal logic. A study of the principles and methods employed in the appraisal of arguments and methodology, which will lead one’s thinking to the accurate attainment of truth. Offered in odd-numbered years. 3 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 .
  
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    PHIL 215 - Business Ethics


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course aims to acquaint students with the growing field of business ethics as a branch of normative ethics.  Students will first become familiar with the major ethical theories and their principles and then learn to apply these ideas to moral dilemmas, issues, and practices within the business world.  Attention will be given to both ethical and economic concepts, such as profit seeking versus profiteering, cost/benefit analysis and human values, foresight and the law of unintended consequences, monopoly, market manipulation, outsourcing, pollution and other externalities, product safety and risk, advertising and fraud, labor rights, social and corporate responsibility, fair trade and market globalization. 3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
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    PHIL 220 - Philosophy of Religion


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will review major philosophical interpretations of the origin, evolution, and nature of religion, review arguments for and against the existence of God, address questions about the nature of God, the possibility of human immortality, the problem of evil, religious pluralism, the relation of religion and morality, and different ways of testing the truth and value of religion. Offered in even-numbered years. This course is a transferIN course. 3 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
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    PHIL 235 - Development of Western Thought


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course is a broad survey of the most influential ideas of the great philosophers from ancient Greece through modern times. Attention will be given to the dialectical role of philosophical argument in shaping the metaphysical, moral, and political ideals of the West, such as liberty and democracy, natural law and reason, science and humanism, faith and skepticism, language and logic, truth and interpretation, subjectivity and objectivity, etc. The political and social contexts in which leading ideas and perspectives have emerged will also be considered. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
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    PHIL 313 - Contemporary Ethical Issues


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course will first attempt to identify the principles common to all the many different ethical theories. It will then seek through the use of specific case studies to apply these principles to the resolution of contemporary moral problems, like euthanasia, discrimination, ecology, terrorism, cloning, etc, in the fields of Medicine/Health Care, Business, Law Enforcement, Environment, and Scientific Research. 3 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ENGL 101 PHIL 212  is recommended.

Pharmacy Technology

  
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    PHRM 105 - Pharmacology I


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Introduction to the principles of pharmacology. Defines the common uses for specific drugs, their therapeutic effects, bioavailability and toxicology information. Emphasis will be placed on dosage forms, dispensing criteria and familiarization of generic drug nomenclature. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    PHRM 110 - Dispensing Lab I


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    An overview of pharmacy computer systems with students receiving hands-on access. The students will transcribe a doctor’s written, verbal, fax, or telephone order. Emphasis will be placed on manufacturing of a product from a batch sheet, patient counseling, and assistance to pharmacists. 6 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A C or better grade or concurrent enrollment in PHRM 105 .
  
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    PHRM 115 - Pharmacy Law and Ethics for Technicians


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Students will be given an overview of Federal and State laws and ethical standards governing the practice of pharmacy. Emphasis will be placed on narcotic dispensing and documentation. Patient education and counseling requirements will be stressed. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    PHRM 200 - Pharmacy Management


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Pharmacy Management explores today’s health care environment, emphasizing the issues facing pharmacy and the pharmacy technician. Skills, talents, and tools required to cope today and succeed tomorrow are developed. This course covers such workplace topics as communication issues, CQI for the pharmacy, legal issues, teamwork concepts and patient instruction techniques. Student participation, role playing, and other interactive learning methods are emphasized. 3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better or concurrent enrollment in PHRM 206 .
  
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    PHRM 206 - Pharmacology II


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Continuation of drug concepts taught in Pharmacology I, with continued emphasis on drug utilization and management. Introduction of Latin abbreviations, measurements and conversion commonly used in pharmacy practice. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in PHRM 105 .
  
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    PHRM 211 - Dispensing Lab II


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    Primary emphasis on manufacturing of sterile products from a physician’s order with a 100 percent accuracy. Aseptic technique and work in a sterile environment will be stressed. 6 laboratory hours.

  
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    PHRM 220 - Pharmacy Calculations


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Major emphasis on drug dose calculations, metric system, and basic skills needed to survive in the pharmacy. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better or concurrent enrollment in MATT 109 .
  
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    PHRM 225 - Practicum


    4 hrs (Sem II)
    A one-semester course designed to allow students to work with patients and other pharmacy professional staff. Students will work in an affiliated hospital or pharmacy. Emphasis will be placed on integration of the students into the profession of pharmacy. 200 practicum hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in PHRM 211 .

Physics

  
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    PHYS 205 - Physics for Scientists and Engineers I


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Designed for engineering and science majors utilizing calculus and covers linear and rotational kinematics and dynamics, work and energy, conservation of energy, linear momentum and angular momentum, equilibrium, oscillations, gravitation, fluid statics and dynamics, simple harmonic motion, wave phenomena, wave motion and sound. This course is a transferIN course. 4 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in or concurrent enrollment in MATH 118 . Corequisite(s): PHYS 205L  
  
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    PHYS 205L - Physics for Scientists and Engineers I Lab


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    Examines principles of PHYS 205 . This course is a transferIN course. 4 laboratory hours.

    Writing Reading Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better or concurrent enrollment in MATH 118 . Corequisite(s): PHYS 205  
  
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    PHYS 206 - Physics for Scientists and Engineers II


    4 hrs (Sem I)
    Heat, thermodynamics, electrostatics, potential and field concepts, dielectrics, DC and AC circuits, magnetic fields, electrodynamics, geometrical optics, and wave optics. This course is a transferIN course. 5 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in or concurrent enrollment in MATH 119 .
  
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    PHYS 206L - Laboratory for Physics for Scientists and Engineers II


    1 hr (Sem I)
    Examines principles of PHYS 206 ; designed to be taken with PHYS 206 . This course is a transferIN course. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): PHYS 206 .
  
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    PHYS 215 - General Physics I


    4 hrs (Sem I, II)
    The course covers mechanics, heat, and sound. This course is a transferIN course. 4 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in MATH 102 ; or a grade of C or better or concurrent enrollment in MATH 104  or higher MATH. It is further expected that the students be proficient in basic trigonometry (sin, cos, tan, Pythagorean Theorem).
  
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    PHYS 215L - General Physics Laboratory I


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Examines principles of PHYS 215 . This course is a transferIN course. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): PHYS 215 .
  
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    PHYS 216 - General Physics II


    4 hrs (Sem II)
    The course covers electricity, magnetism, light, and selected topics in modern physics. This course is a transferIN course. 4 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in MATH 102 ; or a grade of C or better or concurrent enrollment in MATH 104  or higher MATH. It is further expected that the students be proficient in basic trigonometry (sin, cos, tan, Pythagorean Theorem).
  
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    PHYS 216L - General Physics Laboratory II


    1 hr (Sem II)
    Examines principles of PHYS 216 . This course is a transferIN course. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): PHYS 216 .
  
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    PHYS 218 - Essentials of General Physics


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    The course covers mechanics, heat, and sound; the course is primarily for technology students. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in MATH 102  or higher MATH. It is further expected that the students be proficient in basic trigonometry (sin, cos, tan, Pythagorean Theorem). Corequisite(s): PHYS 218L  
  
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    PHYS 218L - Essentials of General Physics Lab


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    Examines principles of PHYS 218 PHYS 218  and PHYS 218L have separate credit, but a common grade will be assigned to each. 4 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): PHYS 218  
  
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    PHYS 300 - Physics III


    4 hrs (Sem II)
    Course examines fundamental gas laws, thermodynamics including equilibrium, chemical kinetics and catalysis, fundamental quantum mechanics including particle physics, wave functions, spectroscopy and bonding. Laboratory experiments include calorimetry, equilibrium, kinetics, spectroscopy, and the determination of various chemical and physical constants. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHEM 106  and PHYS 206 ; and a grade of C or better in MATH 118  or higher.
  
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    PHYS 305 - Statics for the Physical Sciences


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Mechanics for physics students covering vectors, equilibrium, applications involving beams, trusses and cables, hydrostatics, virtual work, potential energy, first and second movements of area, volume and mass. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in MATH 118  and PHYS 205 .
  
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    PHYS 306 - Dynamics for the Physical Sciences


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Mechanics for engineering and physics students covering kinematics, impulse and momentum, work and energy, rectilinear and curvilinear translations, relative motion, and vibrations. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in MATH 119  and PHYS 205 .
  
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    PHYS 317 - Linear Circuits for the Physical Sciences


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Fundamental properties of electric circuits. Ohm’s law, Kirchoff’s laws, mesh and nodal analysis with independent and dependent sources. Superposition, source transformations, Thevenin and Norton equivalency circuits. Transient response of RC, RL, and RLC circuits. Sinusoidal steady-state response and phasor diagrams. Instantaneous power, average power, RMS values. 3 lecture hours, 1 class hour.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in MATH 118 . Corequisite(s): PHYS 317L .
  
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    PHYS 317L - Linear Circuits for the Physical Sciences Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I)
    Experimental exercises in lab instrument use. Voltage, current, impedance, frequency, and wave form measurements; frequency and transient response. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): PHYS 317 .
  
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    PHYS 335 - Thermodynamics for the Physical Sciences


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Develops an understanding of the first law, second law and some physical properties of thermodynamics as well as some competence in application of principles to engineering systems. Entropy, reversible and irreversible processes, closed and open systems, properties of pure substances, control volume analysis, and gas power cycles. 3 lecture hours,1 class hour.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in MATH 119  and PHYS 205 .
  
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    PHYS 366 - Digital Systems for the Physical Sciences


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    An introduction to digital system design and hardware engineering, with an emphasis on practical design techniques and circuit implementation. Topics include Boolean algebra, combinational logic, minimization, gate implementation, electrical characteristics, propagation delay, timing diagrams, signed numbers, arithmetic circuits, flipflops, Mealy and Moore machines, programmable logic devices, ABEL, and simple computer design. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in PHYS 205 . Corequisite(s): PHYS 366L .
  
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    PHYS 366L - Digital Systems for the Physical Sciences Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I)
    Application of design techniques of PHYS 366 . Implementation of logic circuits and systems. TTL and PLD packages are utilized. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): PHYS 366 .

Technical Physics

  
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    PHYT 101 - Technical Physics


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    An introductory course designed for technology majors. The course covers measurement, motion, force, work, energy, power, simple machines, torques, properties of materials, fluids, hydraulics, sound, heat, and electricity. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for MATH 102  or higher, or have a C or better grade in MATT 107  or higher.  It is further expected that the students be proficient in basic trigonometry (sin, cos, tan, Pythagorean Theorem). Corequisite(s): PHYT 101L  
  
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    PHYT 101L - Technical Physics Lab


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Examines principles of PHYT 101 . PHYT 101  and PHYT 101L have separate credit, but a common grade will be assigned to each. 2 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): PHYT 101  

Precision Machining Technology

  
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    PMTD 105 - Understanding Industrial Blueprints


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course is designed to develop students’ ability to interpret needed information contained on industrial blueprints. An overview of reading the blueprint as well as its views, dimensions, tolerances and finishing marks will be stressed.  Assembly and detailed drawings will be examined on an advanced level.  Geometric dimensions, tolerances, and symbols will also be covered.    2 lecture hours.

  
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    PMTD 108 - Introduction to Machine Tools I


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    This course is designed to provide students with instruction on the proper use of various machine tools, including the engine lathe, milling machine, drill press, and surface grinder.  Primary emphasis will be placed on shop safety.  Students will begin interpreting blueprints and machining tolerances.  Offered in sponsored high school programs only. 2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours.

  
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    PMTD 109 - Introduction to Machine Tools II


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    This course is a continuation of PMTD 108.  Students will machine all details necessary to build and assemble a class project to correct blueprint tolerance.  Offered in sponsored high school programs only. 1 lecture, 3 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in PMTD 108 .
  
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    PMTD 110 - Manufacturing Processes


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the processes used to produce industrial goods. Classroom discussion focuses on measurement, layout, inspection, machine tool operation, metallurgy, welding, shop math, blueprint reading, and safety. 2 lecture hours.

    Corequisite(s): PMTD 110L .
 

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