Apr 20, 2021  
2019-2020 Vincennes University Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Vincennes University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM

The course numbering system is alpha-numeric, consisting of four letters and three numbers. The letters indicate the subject area of the course. Developmental courses have a zero as the initial digit. Freshman level courses carry numbers between 100 and 199. Sophomore courses are numbered 200 to 299. Junior and senior level courses carry numbers between 300 and 499.

Speaking and Writing Reading Intensive courses are indicated in the course description section of this catalog.

Listing for Special Instruction Courses. Vincennes University offers instruction tailored to the needs of special populations. The instruction is individualized to the particular needs of the business or industry, with emphasis that the content be college level. The following courses are established to permit flexibility within established credit hour designations.

 

Diesel, Truck and Heavy Equipment Mechanics Technology

  
  •  

    DESL 130 - Diesel Engine Systems


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Instruction presents engine operating principles and theories as well as Diesel Fuel Systems and hands-on training related to modern diesel engines. Students will learn inspection, troubleshooting, overhaul and engine replacement procedures. 3 lecture hours.

    Corequisite(s): DESL 130L .
  
  •  

    DESL 130L - Diesel Engine Systems Laboratory


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This is a hands-on course that introduces the student to the repair of modern diesel engines. The course will include inspection, troubleshooting, overhaul and engine replacement procedures. 9 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): DESL 130  
  
  •  

    DESL 140 - Diesel Hydraulic Systems


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    The study of hydrostatic and hydrodynamic system theory of operation, including gear, piston pumps spool, poppet, and electro-hydraulic valves problem diagnosis and repair procedures. 2 lecture hours.

    Corequisite(s): DESL 140L .
  
  •  

    DESL 140L - Diesel Hydraulic Systems Laboratory


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    This is a hands-on course that introduces the student to the repair and troubleshooting of hydrostatic and hydrodynamic systems. The course will include the repair of gear and piston type pumps, spool, poppet and electro-hydraulic valves. 6 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): DESL 140 .
  
  •  

    DESL 160 - Diesel Preventative Maintenance


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    Course coverage includes inspection of cab and body, tires and wheels, engine compartment, electrical/electronics and cab, undercarriage components. These tasks will be done to DOT specifications. Pre-trip inspections are also covered. 2 lecture hours.

    Corequisite(s): DESL 160L .
  
  •  

    DESL 160L - Diesel Preventative Maintenance Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem II)
    This is a hands-on course that introduces the student to the inspection of a vehicle’s cab, body, tires, wheels, engine compartment, electrical/electronic systems, and undercarriage components per DOT specifications. Pre-trip inspections will also be performed. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): DESL 160 .
  
  •  

    DESL 215 - Diesel Drive Trains


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Instruction presents theory and work activities relating to the transfer of power from the engine to the drive wheels. Troubleshooting, repair, replacement, adjustment and preventative maintenance procedures will be presented for the service of clutches, drive shafts, differentials, drive axles, standard and automatic transmissions. 3 lecture hours.

    Corequisite(s): DESL 215L .
  
  •  

    DESL 215L - Diesel Drive Trains Laboratory


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This is a hands-on course that introduces the student to the repair, inspection, adjustment and replacement of clutches, driveshafts, differential assemblies, and transmissions. 6 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): DESL 215 .
  
  •  

    DESL 220 - Diesel Chassis Systems


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course addresses the diagnosis, repair and various services related to heavyduty wheel, brake, steering, alignment, and suspension systems. 3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Corequisite(s): DESL 220L .
  
  •  

    DESL 220L - Diesel Chassis Systems Laboratory


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This is a hands-on course that introduces the student to the repair of heavy duty wheel, brake, steering and suspension systems. Wheel alignment techniques will also be covered. 9 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): DESL 220 .
  
  •  

    DESL 230 - Diesel HVAC


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course will address theory, diagnosis, and repair of modern heating, ventilation and air-conditioning systems in diesel and heavy equipment. Environmental concerns related to service, recycling and recovery of materials will be stressed. Laboratory activities will present “major specific” topics. 2 lecture hours.

    Corequisite(s): DESL 230L  
  
  •  

    DESL 230L - Diesel HVAC Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    This course involves hands-on activities that introduce the student to the repair of heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems in diesel and heavy equipment. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): DESL 230  
  
  •  

    DESL 240 - Diesel Electronic Systems


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    A continuation of AUTO 110  or DESL 110  which addresses the diagnosis and repair of various electrical and electronic systems commonly found on vehicles today. Electrical/electronic troubleshooting will be stressed. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in AUTO 110  or DESL 110 . Corequisite(s): DESL 240L .
  
  •  

    DESL 240L - Diesel Electronic Systems Laboratory


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    This is a hands-on course that introduces the student to the diagnosis and repair of various electrical and electronic systems commonly found on modern vehicles. Electrical/Electronic troubleshooting will be stressed. 6 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): DESL 240 .
  
  •  

    DESL 270 - Precision Farming Technology


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    An in-depth study of the latest technologies in agriculture.  Presentations and discussions will cover GPS, guidance systems, collection of field data, flow and application control, water solutions and other precision ag applications.  Students will study the impact of new technology on the agriculture industry. The accompanying lab course will add hands on field application. 3 lecture hours.

    Corequisite(s): DESL 270L  
  
  •  

    DESL 270L - Precision Farming Technology Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem II)
    Hands-on in field operation to the latest technologies in agriculture.  Set up of the latest operation screens for GPS, guidance systems, collection of filed data, flow and application control, water solutions and other precision ag applications.  3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): DESL 270  

Graphic Design

NOTE: A grade of C or better must be maintained in all Major Program Requirements or the course(s) must be repeated.

  
  •  

    DESN 110 - Graphic Design I


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Through an introduction of the design process, application of visual organization theory, such as figure/ground relationships, eye-direction, and visual perception will be applied to design problems. Also, basic color theory principles will be studied, such as color harmonies and the perception and psychology of color. Emphasis will be placed on gaining basic technical skills necessary in graphic design, as well as development of individual creativity in solving specific design problems. 6 studio hours.

  
  •  

    DESN 115 - Illustration I


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course is an exploration of illustration as visual communication. Illustrations created with specific communication objectives will be emphasized using a high-level understanding of visual design covered in ARTT 111 . Students will advance their knowledge of traditional and technology based tools covered in DESN 120  and DESN 140 , while developing their own personal style. Successful projects will have met specific objectives, be produced using industry-standard tools, and be ready for inclusion in a portfolio that would qualify for an entry-level graphic design position. 6 studio hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ARTT 111 , DESN 120 , and DESN 140 .
  
  •  

    DESN 120 - Computer Illustration


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course contains in-depth instruction in the use of Adobe Illustrator to produce vector illustrations, graphics and logos. As a studio course, every aspect of the class will be totally hands-on. Each tool and function will be explained, demonstrated and used by every member of the class in order to gain understanding and develop skills and proficiency. A strong background in this industry standard software program is essential in keeping with today’s high technology requirements within the graphic design industry. Areas of concentration include: graphic creation, use of tools, text applications and modifications, and color separations and output. 6 studio hours.

  
  •  

    DESN 140 - Computer Imaging


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will offer advanced, in-depth instruction of all aspects of Adobe Photoshop. Assignments encourage students to explore personal creative expression while developing skills and understanding of color correction and enhancement, image manipulation, photo-composite collage, and filter effects. Students will also gain valuable skills in scanning, image resolution adjustment, and file preparation necessary to produce images for print or web applications. This course will provide a solid background of experience with one of the most essential bitmap imaging tools in the graphic design industry today. 6 studio hours.

  
  •  

    DESN 155 - Computer Page Layout


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course is a comprehensive study of page layout techniques in the digital environment. Current page layout computer applications will be used to create multiple page color documents integrating bitmap images, vector images and type. Areas that will be explored include: master pages, style sheets, tables, copy fitting, link management, and transparency effects. 6 studio hours.

  
  •  

    DESN 201 - Graphic Design/Visual Communication I


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Students will explore and creatively demonstrate the practical application of relationships between specific design elements and principles and their impact on visual communication. Exploration will include creative thinking, brainstorming, and visualization. The projects resulting from this process will be subject to group critique. Successful projects will have met specific objectives, be produced using industry-standard tools and be ready for inclusion in a portfolio that would qualify for an entry-level graphic design position. 6 studio hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ARTT 111  and ARTT 202  or DESN 120 .
  
  •  

    DESN 202 - Graphic Design/Visual Communication II


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    A continuation of understanding of specific design elements and principles and their impact on visual communication. Client and/or community projects may be assigned as class projects. Business and budget considerations will be discussed. The projects resulting from this process will be subject to class presentations and group critiques. Successful projects will have met specific objectives, be produced using industry-standard tools and be ready for inclusion in a portfolio that would qualify for an entry-level graphic design position. 6 studio hours.

    Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DESN 201 .
  
  •  

    DESN 204 - Typography


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Typography will explore the technical and creative subtleties of the letterform and the creative use of typefaces and letterforms as an element of design in visual communication. Students will gain an understanding of typeface development, type identification and type stylization. Other areas of study include type and letter forms as design elements, creative type adjustment through leading, kerning and baseline shift, letterform structure, and modifying characters for logo and identity marks. 6 studio hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DESN 120  or ARTT 202 .
  
  •  

    DESN 205 - Graphic Design for Electronic Media


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will study methods of applying graphic design principles, typography and color theory to interactive technologies, such as websites and mobile devices. Universal design principles will be used to enhance the interactive qualities and functionality of web sites, but also make them aesthetically pleasing. Current graphic user interface software will be utilized to produce the design projects.   6 studio hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ARTT 111  and DESN 140 .
  
  •  

    DESN 215 - Multimedia I


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course offers students the fundamental aspects of multimedia presentations and internet site presentation graphics and animation using Macromedia Flash. Hands-on learning and step-by-step instruction of this software will begin with introductory level projects and expand to more creative and individual intermediate production skills through a variety of design assignments. The course work will develop a solid foundation and practical understanding of the drawing tools, animation, use of sound, scanning and placing images, transitional effects, interactivity and various file formats. 6 studio hours.

  
  •  

    DESN 225 - Advanced Study of Graphic Design


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course is a continuation of Graphic Design II, but will be structured to simulate a working design studio/advertising agency environment. Utilizing contemporary image editing and page layout applications, students will produce a variety of portfolio quality projects focusing on multiple page or panel assignments, such as brochures and packages. An emphasis will be placed on the integration of appropriate design and typography styles into the projects. Proper preparation of computer files for print production will be practiced. 6 studio hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DESN 202 .
  
  •  

    DESN 230 - Multimedia II


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Advanced course work in Macromedia Flash, multimedia and web animation and presentation authoring software, creating interactive and self-running presentations, web applications and animation. Building on DESN 215 , this advanced course will offer students a chance to explore creative and original avenues that include working with and inputting sound, graphics, digital images, video, and animation into web applications. As a capstone for the program, students will build their personal, digital multimedia portfolio/self promotional piece suitable for CD and internet presentation. 6 studio hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DESN 215 .
  
  •  

    DESN 240 - Computer Illustration II


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course is a refined study of digital manipulation through the use of image editing software. More complex layer techniques, use of scanner as an input device, various source materials and non‑traditional presentations are explored. Discussions will include aesthetics and ethics of using digitally modified images. Increased emphasis is placed on the computer as a tool for the enhancement of photographic images and illustration. 6 studio hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DESN 140 .
  
  •  

    DESN 250 - Portfolio Review


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Students will finalize design projects for inclusion in their portfolios. At the completion of the course, student portfolios will be reviewed by faculty members and members of the Graphic Design Advisory Committee. Resume writing, job interview skills, and job search skills will be included in the course content. 6 studio hours.

    Writing Reading Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DESN 205 , DESN 202 , and DESN 240 .
  
  •  

    DESN 260 - Graphic Design/Visual Communication III


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course covers the application of design into final art on disk, ready for press output. Projects are developed from the needs of the community, college, and local businesses. Projects may include package labels, posters, corporate identities, and other applicable assignments. These projects are developed through the concept and design stage to final computer files ready for the printing process. Contemporary image editing and page layout applications will be utilized in the production of the designs on disk. An emphasis will be placed on the characteristics of how different software applications interact, as well as the strengths and weaknesses of each application in producing final production art. Portfolio quality projects are presented to clients as comprehensive layouts. 6 studio hours.

    Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DESN 120 , DESN 140 , and DESN 202 .

Product Design and Production Processes

  
  •  

    DRAF 100 - Understanding Industrial Blueprints and Drafting


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course has two major areas of content. First, it is designed to develop students’ ability to interpret needed information, symbols, abbreviations, and conventions contained on industrial blueprints. The second part of the course will be an emphasis on hand drafting to visualize and interpret plan views, sections, and details in prints generated manually. This course will be offered at the VU Jasper Campus. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    DRAF 101 - Understanding Industrial Blueprints and CAD Designs


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course has two major areas of content. First, it is designed to develop students’ ability to interpret needed information contained on industrial blueprints. An overview of reading the blueprint as well as its views, dimensions, tolerances and finishing marks will be stressed. Assembly and detailed drawings will be examined on an advanced level. Geometric dimensions, tolerances, and symbols will also be covered. The second part of the course will be an introduction to CAD/CAM drawing and software. Students will utilize software to design 3D drawings and create multi view 2D drawings from their 3D renderings. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    DRAF 110 - Mechanical Drafting


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Introduction to basic concepts and ANSI practices of technical drawing. Topics include lettering, use and care of instruments, applied geometry, sketching, multiview projection, pictorial projection, auxiliary projection, and sectioning. 2 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    DRAF 120 - Computers for Technology


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    This course is designed to meet the special computer needs of technology students. Computer software and hardware experiences, as they relate to technology students, will be covered. No prior computer experience is assumed. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    DRAF 140 - Introduction to CAD


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Introduction to computer aided drafting using AutoCAD software. This course is primarily designed for drafting and surveying majors but open to all students interested in learning the basics of AutoCAD. Topics include: 2D drawing commands, coordinate systems, editing commands, paper and model space, inquiry commands, layers, plotting, text, and basic dimensioning. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    DRAF 145 - CREO Fundamentals


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Topics include sketching, part modeling, assemblies, editing, parametric relationships, configuration files, and basic model management techniques. 2 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    DRAF 150 - Descriptive Geometry


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    Students will draw and calculate three-dimensional problems. Theory and methods include graphic developments and the relationships between points, lines and planes, curved lines and surfaces, intersections, and development. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    DRAF 155 - Advanced Mechanical Drafting


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    A continuation of DRAF 110 . Skill development is placed on the ASME methods of dimensioning and tolerancing of mating parts, threads and fasteners, working drawings, and manufacturing processes. 2 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DRAF 110  and DRAF 150 .
  
  •  

    DRAF 185 - CREO Advanced Part Design


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Topics include patterning, family tables, relations, measuring and inspecting models, groups, copy, mirror, assembly creation, explode states, layers, map keys, investigating parent/child relationships, capturing design intent, and resolving failures. 2 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DRAF 110  and DRAF 145 .
  
  •  

    DRAF 210 - Tool Design Principles


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course covers the design concepts involved in production tooling.  Specific topics will include jig, fixture, die and mold design.  Selection and design procedures for the utilization of standard tooling components and materials in jig and fixture design.  Topics of die design include blanking, piercing, notching, and bending.  Topics of injection mold design include mold base selection, shrinkage, actions, inserts, core pins, ejectors, gates, runners, and cooling. 2 lecture hours, 6 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DRAF 155 DRAF 185 , and DRAF 230 .
  
  •  

    DRAF 211 - CAD for Industrial Applications


    3 hrs (Summer)
    Introduces computer aided drafting (CAD) using latest AutoDesk Inventor program, AutoCAD, 2-D and 3-D software.  Students develop skills in drawing set-up and organization, drawing and editing objects, creating complex shapes, dimensioning, using text, display and layer control, using symbols and plotting.  Developing CAD models, executing 3D printers from CAD and creating drawings are also included in this course. No previous computer experience is required, but a background in fundamental blueprint and/or drafting skills is recommended.  This course will be offered at the VU Jasper Campus. 1 lecture hour, 4 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DRAF 100 .
  
  •  

    DRAF 220 - Plastic Part Design


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    This course provides a fundamental overview of plastic part design for the process of injection molding. Emphasis is placed on plastic part design and material selection to aid in the development of a plastic part that is functional, manufacturable, and aesthetically pleasing. Topics will include appropriate material selection, functional design considerations (draft, wall thickness, textures, sinks, knit lines, etc.), assembly techniques and manufacturing considerations. Similar processes such as blow molding, extrusion, thermoforming and die-casting will also be discussed. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DRAF 155 .
  
  •  

    DRAF 230 - Tolerancing Applications


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Includes solutions to typical tolerancing problems in manufacturing individual parts and assemblies. Topics include ANSI/ASME dimensioning methods, tolerancing techniques, tolerance analysis, and geometric dimensioning and tolerancing. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DRAF 110 ; and students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
  •  

    DRAF 278 - CREO Production Drawings, Surfaces, and Sheetmetal


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Production Drawings will include how to create drawings and formats, parametric notes, automated bill of materials, how to detail drawings, and how to take advantage of the parametric and associative nature of the CAD data when configuring drawings. Surface Modeling will include the use of various techniques to create complex surfaces with tangent and curvature continuities, creating solids using surfaces as references, how to analyze surfaces for quality, and various editing tools used to manipulate surfaces. Sheetmetal Design will include the design characteristics of sheetmetal parts and assemblies, creation of sheetmetal design models using sheetmetal features, creation of the flat state of the model, and documenting the design. 2 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DRAF 155  and DRAF 185 .
  
  •  

    DRAF 285 - Employment Seeking Methods


    1 hr (Sem I)
    This course is designed to prepare students for the task of looking for employment upon graduation. Content will include writing cover letters, resume writing, personal presentation, employee rights, interview process, job search methods, and how to analyze the job interview. 1 lecture hour.

  
  •  

    DRAF 286 - Introduction to Additive Manufacturing


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    Comprehensive study of rapid prototyping (RP) and Additive Manufacturing (AM).  Primary topics will include prototype fundamentals, terminology, machine technology, advantages vs. disadvantages of various technologies, materials, and finishing for industry. 2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DRAF 155 , DRAF 185 , and DRAF 230 .
  
  •  

    DRAF 287 - Product Design Principles


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Students will develop products through all phases of development, from initial research and problem statement through sketches, mock-ups, renderings, and a final full-size appearance model incorporating ergonomic and population percentiles data, and design products for function and ease of use.  2 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DRAF 210 , DRAF 220 DRAF 278 , and DRAF 286 .  
  
  •  

    DRAF 288 - Reverse Engineering/Laser Scanning


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Students will learn the reverse engineering process of measuring an object and then reconstructing it as a 3D model.  Measurement methods will include open inspection layout and laser scanning equipment.  Creation and manipulation of data using various software will be covered. 2 lecture, 4 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DRAF 210 , DRAF 220 , DRAF 278 , and DRAF 286 .
  
  •  

    DRAF 289 - Additive Manufacturing Processes


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    Applied laboratory activities in additive manufacturing and post-production finishing or processes on different rapid prototyping machines.  Comprehensive study of rapid prototyping (RP) and additive manufacturing tooling.  Application of secondary processes and finishing for RP models, resin casting, and silicone mold making. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DRAF 210 , DRAF 220 , DRAF 278 , and DRAF 286 .
  
  •  

    DRAF 294 - CREO Advanced Assembly and Mechanism Design


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will cover two specific topics and will be taught as two classes. Topics of Advanced Assembly will include the use of advanced assembly tools that enable addition to and maintenance of the design, methods to increase system performance when working with large assemblies, creating and using predefined assembly structures and skeletons, and using simplified representations in complex parts and assemblies. Topics of Mechanism Design will include mechanism connections, configuring the mechanism model, creating a kinematic analysis and evaluating results, determining the range of motion between components in moving assemblies, creating of cam connections that enable parts to “push” other parts they come into contact with, and checking for collisions between moving components. 2 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in DRAF 210  and DRAF 278 .
  
  •  

    DRAF 370 - CREO for Advanced Machinists


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will provide the student with the study of three-dimensional parametric modeling by applying creation methods utilized for solid, sheet metal, and surface data using Pro/Engineer CAD software. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in or concurrent enrollment in PMTD 380 .

Economics

  
  •  

    ECON 100 - Elements of Economics


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    An introductory course intended primarily for students who need only one semester of economics. A survey of microeconomics, macroeconomics, international economics, comparative economic systems, historical development of economic thought. This course is a transferIN course. 3 lecture hours.

  
  •  

    ECON 201 - Microeconomics


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    A descriptive and analytical study of the market economy, including market structures, pricing, and distribution and determination of wealth and income. This course is a transferIN course. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 , or higher.
  
  •  

    ECON 202 - Macroeconomics


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    A descriptive and analytical study of fundamental concepts of our national economy. It includes an analysis of the determination and fluctuations in national income and employment, monetary and fiscal policy, and international trade and finance. Economic analysis of monetary and fiscal policies is stressed. This course is a transferIN course. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 , or higher.
  
  •  

    ECON 203 - Survey of Labor Economics


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Introductory course dealing with trade union development and structure, collective bargaining, labor-government relationships, development and application of labor laws, and employment aspects of civil rights legislation. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 , or higher.
  
  •  

    ECON 208 - Personal Financial Management


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    A study of the financial concerns of individuals and families. Included are family budgeting, insurance decisions, estate planning, installment buying, investment planning and tax problems. This course is a transferIN course. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 , or higher.
  
  •  

    ECON 280 - Introduction to International Economics


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will examine the volume and characteristics of the international economy. Recent trends and developments in international trade, finance, and government policies will be analyzed using economic principles and theories. Topics covered will include: why trade exists between nations, balance of trade, trade barriers and their effects, balance of payments and economic adjustments, fixed versus flexible exchange rates, and the effects of government trade policies. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ECON 201  and ECON 202 .

Education

  
  •  

    EDUC 200 - Computer Technology for Teachers


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course will give education students an introduction to the computer as an instructional tool. Students will be instructed and guided through the process of learning the techniques of internet searching, software downloads and evaluation, creating tests with Microsoft Word, website creation, PowerPoint presentations, creating of school newsletters, resume building, use of Google Earth, use of Excel as a grade book and portfolio development. 3 lecture hours.

  
  •  

    EDUC 218 - Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course will include an overview of research and theory in the development of behavior in infancy, childhood, and youth, emphasizing physical, intellectual, and social development. Emphasis on the ideas of Piaget, Freud, Kohlberg, Erikson, Bronfenbrenner, Gessel, and others will be made. Child-study, childcare role playing, and class demonstrations will be an integral portion of the learning experiences. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in PSYC 142 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 241 - Diversity for the Classroom Teacher


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course will examine the societal implications of race, class, gender, language, exceptionality, and immigration on today’s classroom teacher. Course will consider culturally informed instructional strategies and decision-making that impact teachers, students, and the school community, both inside and outside of the classroom. 2 class hours.

  
  •  

    EDUC 242 - Educational Psychology


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Presents psychological variables in learning, devoting time to factors that affect the quality and direction of teaching. Students consider four broad areas: the teacher–his/her preparation, goals, uses of psychology, classroom responsibilities; the students - how their growth affects learning and adjustment; the classroom and other learning situations; and procedures for directing classroom activities. An optional lab is offered with this course; see course description for EDUC 242L . 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in PSYC 142 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 242L - Field Experiences in Educational Psychology


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Provides students with the opportunity to generate 15 additional hours of field experiences for transfer to 4-year institutions that require field experiences with Educational Psychology. The primary activities of this lab are directed observations, completion of observation forms, journaling, and sharing experiences with classmates. 1 laboratory hour.

    Corequisite(s): EDUC 242 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 251 - Fundamentals of Assistive Technology


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    An overview of a variety of assistive technology devices, services, and systems will be introduced including those that enhance individual mobility, communication, learning, work, recreation, and daily living skills. Students will learn to understand and appreciate the impact of assistive technology on the lives of people with disabilities at school, work, and home. Related legislation and the assessment process will be explored. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 ; and must qualify for MATH 013  or MATH 022 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 260 - Childhood Health, Safety, and Nutrition


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Covers contemporary health, safety, and nutrition needs from infancy through early childhood. Emphasizes the importance of respecting and partnering with families to help children establish healthy lifestyles and achieve their learning potential. The course is directed to early childhood educators and child care professionals, although parents and families would benefit. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 290 - Initial Experiences in Education


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Designed to give students interested in an education major an opportunity to observe and participate in the public or parochial school education process, to receive supervision and guidance in developing teaching roles, and to share with others their experiences as a means of determining individual professional career choices. Major topics include motivation, values, lesson planning, classroom management, direct and indirect instruction, professionalism, microteaching, portfolio development, and INTASC standards. 3 lecture hours, 1 laboratory hour.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 ; and must qualify for MATH 016  or MATH 032 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 291 - Introduction to Exceptionalities


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    An overview of disabilities in regards to definition, etiology, characteristics, and preventions. Teaching and parenting roles will be explored in relation to current practices used in today’s classroom. Methods used to help individuals achieve their full potential will be considered. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 292 - Foundations of Education


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course provides a contemporary view of the field of education and presents key issues to students who are considering a career as a teacher. Through lectures, films, speakers and school visits, students will cover the topics of philosophical foundations, history of American education, teacher motives, problems, skills and attitudes, school models, curriculum and administration, unionism, inequality, violence, student rights, salaries, the job market and licensing. 3 lecture hours.

  
  •  

    EDUC 310 - Management of Classroom Behavior


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will present best practices in effective classroom management, including how to establish a productive classroom climate, how to work with all students, and how to apply a variety of management techniques to help students become responsible for their behaviors and choices. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 311 - Classroom Management for the Secondary Classroom


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will present best practices in effective classroom management for middle and high school educators.  Course content will include classroom organization, establishing rules and procedures, record keeping, planning and implementing instruction, managing problematic student behaviors, and communication skills.  3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education Program
  
  •  

    EDUC 312 - Organization and Administration of Assistive Technology


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    The student will develop skills and demonstrate proficiency in the knowledge and use of assistive technology devices, services, and systems in a school setting. Students will be able to document, research for specific devices, and develop maintenance plans. Assessment planning, protocol development, information management, and administrative methods will be explored. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Education - Special Education, Mild Interventions K-12 1001, B.S.  program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 330 - Teaching Methods and Materials


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will describe teaching methods, materials, and learning assessment employed in the instruction of exceptional learners. Specifically, the focus of this course will be instructional methods and materials for students with mild intervention needs, including learning disabilities, mild mental disabilities, and emotional disabilities. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 340 - Mild Interventions


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will describe specific information regarding definition, etiology, characteristics, teaching strategies, and curricula for use with individuals who have Mild Intellectual and Developmental or Specific Learning Disabilities. Best practices will be presented as well as current trends and events in these fields. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 342 - Emotional Disabilities


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will describe specific information regarding definition, etiology, and characteristics. Developing skills used in assessment, teaching strategies, and behavior management for students who have emotional disabilities will be addressed. A functional assessment will be required. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 346 - Autism Spectrum Disorders


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will present issues related to diagnosis, etiologies, and characteristics of autism and provide the learner with readings, discussions and activities related to the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). 3 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 350 - Curriculum and Assessment: Today’s Classroom


    4 hrs (Sem II)
    This course prepares pre-service teachers at all levels to assess learning through a variety of instruments. Standardized test interpretation, preparations of teacher-generated tests that accurately assess objectives, authentic assessment, and a philosophy of evaluation and assessment will be emphasized. Students will also consider legal and ethical issues in learner assessment and communication of progress. 4 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 352 - Collaboration and Partnering: Community, Family and Paraprofessionals


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will present collaboration and partnering strategies between school professionals (special educators, general educators, and paraprofessionals), parents/families, service providers, and community outreach programs. Team strategies and communication skills used to create productive partnerships will be explored and developed. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 360 - The Teaching of Elementary Social Studies


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will present research-based techniques and strategies that are considered to be best-practices in the field of social studies and are effective in motivating elementary students to acquire the information, skills, and modes of reasoning unique to the social sciences. Students are expected to plan and implement instruction that demonstrates the use of various methods, techniques, and materials and to expand their understanding in the field of social studies. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 361 - The Teaching of Elementary Science


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course is designed to explore and practice effective science pedagogy in the elementary school. Experiences will be provided that focus on learning theories, incorporating national and Indiana Department of Education standards in planning and instruction, the scope and sequence of science curriculum, methods of investigation, problem solving, laboratory skills, scientific attitudes, and observing and working with elementary school children. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 362 - The Teaching of Elementary Language Arts and Reading


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will present theory and methodology of teaching elementary language arts and reading. Basic skills to help students develop competency in oral and written language will be explored. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 363 - The Teaching of Elementary School Mathematics


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    This course is designed to present materials, devices, and methods of teaching mathematics in the elementary school. 2 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in MATH 112 ; a grade of C or better or concurrent enrollment in MATH 212 ; and admission to Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 364 - Corrective Reading in the Elementary School


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will emphasize the analysis, diagnosis and correction of reading problems. Students will participate in clinical experiences with elementary students. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education Program and a grade of C or better in EDUC 362 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 372 - Teaching in the Inclusive Classroom


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will address issues related to the inclusion of students with disabilities into general education classrooms. Students will have the opportunity to develop a personal philosophy of inclusive education, explore collaboration in schools, and learn tools for modifying and adapting curriculum and instruction to facilitate positive outcomes for students with exceptionalities in general education classrooms. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 393 - Practicum in Special Education


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Supervised internship experiences in special education agencies and/or elementary school classrooms and on-campus sessions providing simulated problem situations and instruction in appropriate teaching techniques. Exposure to practical problems and solutions related to elementary or secondary education students with exceptionalities. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in EDUC 290  and EDUC 291  ; and admission to Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 395 - Cultural Immersion Project


    1 hr (Sem I)
    This course provides preservice teachers an opportunity to observe and participate in a cultural immersion project to develop a deeper understanding of diversity issues within a school setting. 1 laboratory hour.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Teacher Education Program. Corequisite(s): EDUC 393  
  
  •  

    EDUC 421 - Teaching Secondary Mathematics I


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    The materials, devices and methods of teaching mathematics in secondary schools. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in MATH 301 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 422 - Teaching Secondary Mathematics II


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    A second course in the materials, devices and methods of teaching mathematics in secondary schools. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in EDUC 421 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 423 - Topics in Mathematics Education and Contemporary Adolescent Literacy Standards


    4 hrs (Sem II)
    Topics from various areas of mathematics education and/or mathematics which are not included in the regular undergraduate courses. In addition, this course is designed to help prospective secondary education teachers in all science content areas increase and enhance students’ learning through reading and writing by exploring the processes, principles and practices that support literacy development in the content area classroom. Offered in alternate (even-numbered) years. 4 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in MATH 301 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 424 - Geometries for Teachers


    1 hr (Sem II)
    A course in the materials, devices and methods of teaching geometry in secondary schools. Offered in alternate (even-numbered) years. 1 lecture hour.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in MATH 301 . Corequisite(s): MATH 311 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 431 - Teaching Secondary Science I


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Presents those techniques of science instruction and instructional materials most applicable to the teaching of science in the secondary school setting. Selection, utilization and evaluation of manipulatives, audiovisual materials, and equipment. Emphasis on use of current technology. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
  
  •  

    EDUC 432 - Teaching Secondary Science II


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    A second course in the materials, devices, and methods of teaching science in secondary schools. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in EDUC 431 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 433 - Topics in Science Education and Adolescent Literacy and Reading Research


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Topics from various areas of science education and/or science. In addition, this course is designed to help prospective secondary education teachers in all science content areas increase and enhance students’ learning through reading and writing by exploring the processes, principles and practices that support literacy development in the content area classroom. Offered in alternate (even-numbered) years. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in 8 credits of science courses.
  
  •  

    EDUC 477 - Supervised Student Teaching in Elementary Education


    5 hrs (Sem II)
    The Student Teaching experience will be completed in an inclusive classroom under the direct supervision of the University field supervisor and host teacher. Portfolio development will continue with the addition of artifacts related to interventions for students placed in the general education classrooms. One week of student orientation, followed by seven weeks of full-day teaching and related duties are required. 210 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Student Teaching.
  
  •  

    EDUC 492 - Supervised Student Teaching in Mild Intervention


    5 hrs (Sem II)
    Students will engage in full-day supervised student teaching in a special education classroom serving students with mild intervention needs. The students will be supervised by university supervisors and cooperating teachers at the host school during the eight week session of full-day experience. Students may have two placements depending on the exceptionality grouping at the site. The portfolio development begun in EDUC 200  will be completed by the end of this semester. 210 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Student Teaching.
  
  •  

    EDUC 493 - Senior Capstone Experience in Education


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    A course intended to synthesize and integrate the knowledge and skills of teaching and the general and liberal education course work. Students will be required to complete a major research project aimed at addressing a philosophic, social, political, economic, or historical problem connected to education. Activities in the course will include a major research paper and an oral presentation based on significant research and project results. These activities will be opportunities for students to display the content knowledge, research skills, critical thinking, affective learning, and presentation skills needed to be life-long learners. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to Student Teaching.
  
  •  

    EDUC 494 - Capstone Experience; Secondary Science or Mathematics Education


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    A course intended to synthesize and integrate the knowledge and skills of the major course work and the general and liberal education course work. Students will be required to complete a major research paper aimed at addressing a philosophic, social, political, economic, or historical problem connected to Secondary Science or Mathematics Education. Activities in the course will include a major research paper and an oral presentation based on significant research and project results. These activities will be opportunities for students to display the content knowledge, research skills, critical thinking, affective learning, and presentation skills needed to be lifelong learners. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in EDUC 421  and EDUC 422  or a grade of C or better in EDUC 431  and EDUC 432 . Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 495 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 495 - Teaching in Public Schools


    9 hrs (Sem II)
    Sixteen weeks of student teaching, including eight weeks at the middle school level and eight weeks at the secondary school level, to fit the needs of the individual student teacher.  A minimum of 400 clinical hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in EDUC 421  and EDUC 422 ; or a grade of C or better in EDUC 431  and EDUC 432 .

Electronics Technology

  
  •  

    ELEC 101 - Fundamentals of Audio Equipment Maintenance


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Practical introduction to electricity, magnetism, circuit elements, test equipment and procedures, trouble shooting, preventive maintenance. Required course for students enrolled in the Music–Audio Recording Certificate Program. 4 lecture/laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    ELEC 105 - Electronic Circuit Analysis I


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course will include basic DC/AC circuit analysis using Ohm’s Law, use of test equipment, interpretation of circuit diagrams, and basic soldering. Emphasis is on basic concepts and servicing techniques. 2 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    ELEC 110 - Basic Component and Circuit Analysis


    6 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Develops an understanding of basic DC and AC theory with mathematical analysis. Emphasis is on the function and characteristics of electronic components, basic circuit configurations, RCL circuits, vector analysis and resonance. 3 lecture hours, 9 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 ; and must qualify for MATH 013  or MATT 017 , or higher.
 

Page: 1 <- 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 -> 17