Apr 20, 2021  
2019-2020 Vincennes University Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Vincennes University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM

The course numbering system is alpha-numeric, consisting of four letters and three numbers. The letters indicate the subject area of the course. Developmental courses have a zero as the initial digit. Freshman level courses carry numbers between 100 and 199. Sophomore courses are numbered 200 to 299. Junior and senior level courses carry numbers between 300 and 499.

Speaking and Writing Reading Intensive courses are indicated in the course description section of this catalog.

Listing for Special Instruction Courses. Vincennes University offers instruction tailored to the needs of special populations. The instruction is individualized to the particular needs of the business or industry, with emphasis that the content be college level. The following courses are established to permit flexibility within established credit hour designations.

 

Computer Programming Technology

  
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    COMP 177 - Introduction to Programming Logic, Design and Development


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course is an introductory programming course that orients students to programming concepts and logic without assuming any previous programming experience. Fundamental concepts of flow charting and pseudocode will be covered. Demonstrations in business problem and solution techniques will be reviewed. 3 class hours.

  
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    COMP 185 - Introduction to Databases


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    The course will feature database design and relational design principles based on dependencies and normal forms. This course introduces students to practical and theoretical database concepts. In addition, students learn to model databases using the entity relationship diagram method. The database language concepts while general in nature are demonstrated using an SQL platform. Overall database design and implementation issues will also be presented.  3 lecture/laboratory hours.

  
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    COMP 190 - Game Modeling and Animation I


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course introduces students to game modeling and animation aspects of game creation. Students explore current tools used by industry leaders to create models, textures, animations and game environments. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

  
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    COMP 191 - Computer Science I


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This entry-level course introduces students to thinking algorithmically and solving problems efficiently. Students will learn introductory computer science concepts such as abstraction, algorithms, data structures, encapsulation, resource management, security, and software engineering. Projects for the course will be based on trending topics in Information Technology such as databases, artificial intelligence, graphics, simulation and modeling, security, and the social impact of computing. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

  
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    COMP 201 - The Computer in Business


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course is designed to develop computer competency in a variety of computer related skills such as spreadsheets, databases, Internet software and Windows, as well as a basic working knowledge of computer and information concepts appropriate for most organizations. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

  
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    COMP 202 - Business Documents and Presentations


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Using trending multi-media tools, students will learn word processing and document creation as well as creating and modifying professional quality presentations. This course includes working with text and objects, layout editing, video graphics, audio elements, and advanced formatting techniques. Students will be assessed a lab fee for the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Word certification exam.  3 lecture/laboratory hours.

  
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    COMP 203 - Object Oriented Programming


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course introduces the fundamental concepts of object-oriented programming, programming methodology, and advanced data structures and algorithms. Microcomputer experience will be beneficial as the various features of object-oriented languages are explored. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A passing grade in COMP 177 .
  
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    COMP 212 - Managing Business with Computers


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Students will acquire basic concepts of Windows skills in file management; Web Site design and hosting; Microsoft Office Applications including Word, Excel and PowerPoint; Email; Internet features and advanced web searches; Video Conferencing; Electronic Commerce; Content Management; Project Management; Mobile Applications, sketching and prototyping. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

  
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    COMP 215 - Database Management/SQL


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Students will learn how to create and maintain databases using database manager software. Topics will include creating tables, and loading tables, as well as creating objects from tables such as queries, forms, and reports. Database manipulation and maintenance will also be stressed. User-written procedures and access to other languages will be introduced. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in COMP 185 .
  
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    COMP 216 - Microsoft Word Certification


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    This one credit hour course concentrates on reviewing the fundamentals for achieving the MOS Word certification. Students will be assessed lab fees for the use of Gmetrix and for the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Word certification exam.  1 lecture/laboratory hour.

  
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    COMP 217 - Microsoft PowerPoint Certification


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    This one credit hour course concentrates on reviewing the fundamentals for achieving the MOS PowerPoint certification. Students will be assessed lab fees for the use of Gmetrix and for the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) PowerPoint certification exam.  1 lecture/laboratory hour.

  
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    COMP 218 - Microsoft Excel Certification


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    This one credit hour course concentrates on reviewing the fundamentals for achieving the MOS Excel certification. Students will be assessed lab fees for the use of Gmetrix and for the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Excel certification exam. 1 lecture/laboratory hour.

  
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    COMP 219 - Microsoft Access Certification


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    This one credit hour course concentrates on reviewing the fundamentals for achieving the MOS Access certification. Students will be assessed lab fees for the use of Gmetrix and for the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Access certification exam.  1 lecture/laboratory hour.

  
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    COMP 220 - Certified Secure Computer User Certification (CSCU)


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    This one credit hour course concentrates on reviewing the fundamentals for achieving the EC-Council CSCU certification. Students will be assessed lab fees for the use of lab manual tutorials and for the E-Council Certified Secure Computer User certification exam. 1 lecture/laboratory hour.

  
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    COMP 221 - Office Proficiency Assessment and Certification (OPAC)


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    This one credit hour course concentrates on the most critical skills and abilities required in today’s administrative and clerical positions. OPAC’s complete suite of validated tests includes typing speed and accuracy, Microsoft® Windows®, Word®, Excel®, Outlook®, PowerPoint®, and QuickBooks® (amongst many other applications and skills). The program also provides specialized assessments for the legal, medical, and customer service fields. Students will be assessed a lab fee for the certification exam. 1 lecture/laboratory hour.

  
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    COMP 232 - Business Driven Communications and Networking


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course is designed to give students a technical understanding of data networking and telecommunications that are imperative in competitive business enterprises. Topics in this course include understanding home networking, enterprise networking, (LAN) local and (WAN) wide area networks. Basic network topologies and characteristic fundamentals are discussed. The fundamentals of networking will build a foundation of why we have networks and what role Networking Standards and Organizations like the IEEE play in creating and maintaining a reliable network. The OSI and TCP/IP model will be covered to provide the theory and logic of how networks incorporate protocols and standards. Cabling fundamentals and standards explore the physical layer of networking. The concepts of (ICT) Information and Communication Technology will be applied throughout this course as students learn when and why specific technology is used. Students will realize the important role that technology can play in helping organizations achieve a competitive advantage. A lab fee will be assessed to students for purchase of a voucher to be used for taking an industry-recognized certification exam upon completion of the course. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

  
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    COMP 234 - Records Management and Business Intelligence


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Students will study activities required for records filing and storage, methods for managing records systems, and managing the administration of the life-cycle of business essential records. The use of spreadsheets to sort and search records, combine files, produce reports, and the extract data from a file will be presented. This course is designed to include creating and formatting worksheets, using formulas and basic functions, creating charts, and printing professional-looking reports. Students will be assessed a lab fee for the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Excel certification exam. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

  
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    COMP 242 - Creating a Personal Brand and e-Portfolio


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course examines the importance of identifying and developing a personal brand.  Students will engage in a series of self- and peer-assessments that will identify skills set, value proposition and competitive differentiation.  The importance of conveying a consistent personal brand will be a focus. Students will develop professional presentation skills, interviewing and networking skills, proper social media etiquette, and participate in targeted professional associations appropriate for their desired career. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

  
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    COMP 246 - Computer Configuration and Management II


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will be a continuation of COMP 146 Computer Configuration and Management I. Students will continue to explore the configuration, management, troubleshooting, and installation of various types of computers and devices commonly used in both personal and corporate environments. Additional emphasis will be placed on information and data security and the challenges associated with ensuring data integrity, especially with the widespread use and proliferation of mobile devices. Students will be presented with a variety of scenarios in which technical skills will be utilized in order to meet the various demands of those associated with both the Information Technology and Security-related fields. A lab fee will be assessed to students for purchase of a voucher to be used for taking an industry-recognized certification exam upon completion of the course. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in COMP 146 .
  
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    COMP 250 - Game and Artificial Intelligence Programming II


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course is a continuation of Game and Artificial Intelligence Programming I. Students continue learning about game programming, choosing a game type, and adding artificial intelligence programming to previously created game models. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A passing grade in COMP 115 , COMP 150 , and COMP 190 .
  
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    COMP 252 - Introduction to Java Programming


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course introduces students to object-oriented programming concepts along with the Java syntax to implement them. At the end of this course, students should be able to write small applications and to program with Java on their own. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A passing grade in COMP 177 .
  
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    COMP 256 - Office Management Communications


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course provides students with a basic background in modern theory and practice in office organization and management, including such topics as management styles, problem solving, and communication. Students will be exposed to a variety of communication and collaboration tools, as well as giving oral presentations and working on group projects containing written and oral components. An emphasis will be put on how to avoid cyber security phishing attacks through email systems.  Students will be assessed a lab fee for the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Outlook certification exam. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
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    COMP 257 - Advanced Web Page Design


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will introduce advanced topics not covered in COMP 107 . Students will be introduced to HTML5. The proper use of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and javascript will be emphasized. Students will be required to produce a Web site containing style sheets, javascript, and HTML5. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in COMP 107  and COMP 185 .
  
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    COMP 275 - Mobile Application Development


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will allow students to learn advanced development topics, including how to publish and sell applications in their respective apps stores. Students will experience using development frameworks and Web services in their applications. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to develop Web sites that are ready for mobile device deployment. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

  
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    COMP 290 - Game Modeling and Animation II


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course is a continuation of Game Modeling and Animation I. Students continue learning about tools used for model, texture, and animation creation by using industry standard tools. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A passing grade in COMP 115 , COMP 150 , and COMP 190 .
  
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    COMP 291 - Computer Science II


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This second course in Computer Science builds on introductory concepts and best practices.  Specific emphasis is placed on data structures and data abstraction for the development of software systems and software engineering. Additional topics covered are sets, linked lists, stacks, queues, hash tables, trees, heaps, and graphs. Students will complete projects to demonstrate the ability to develop algorithms used for searching, sorting, and data structure manipulation, with the intent to utilize program efficiency.  3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in COMP 191 .
  
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    COMP 295 - Systems Development


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    The capstone course reviews and applies system development theory and methodologies, and covers the components of the traditional life cycle of a system. Students produce a design and workable project individually to gain an appreciation of the documentation and planning of an information system. Other activities include the review and analysis of existing designs and discussions on the importance of working as team members. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 ; and have a grade of C or better in COMP 185 ; and a grade of C or better in COMP 203  or COMP 252  or COMP 257 .
  
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    COMP 300 - Career and Internship Preparation


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    This course demonstrates the importance of understanding career path options in the information technology field to ensure successful transition from graduation to employment.  During the course, students will complete a series of assessments to identify their career values and goals in order to get on track for being successful in obtaining meaningful work. Students will engage with industry employers to learn about various career and employment options and requirements. The final deliverable of the course is a career plan that aligns the appropriate internship, coursework, and certifications needed to be employable in a chosen industry and profession.  1 lecture/laboratory hour.

  
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    COMP 310 - Managing Information Technology


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course is designed as an introduction to the financial, technical, and strategic information systems planning process. Emphasis is on the relationship of the information systems planning process to overall business goals, policies, plans, management style, and industry conditions. The selection of large systems projects, assessment of a currently installed system, determining approaches to staffing, software, hardware, processing, and financing an information system are studied. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    COMP 340 - Ethical Hacking and Cyber Security


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course is designed to cover a wide range of security topics, including how defenses work, scanning, and attacks against networks. This course will introduce students to a variety of different tools, malware, and viruses in order to provide a complete understanding of the tactics and methodology used by hackers. Understanding the methods by which hackers operate, students will be prepared to set up strong countermeasures and defensive systems in order to protect an organization’s critical infrastructure and information. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    COMP 341 - CEH Certification Preparation


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    This course will prepare students to take the EC-Council ANSI accredited Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) exam 312-50. Students will review content such as scanning, testing, and ethically hacking networks, how intruders escalate privileges, steps to take in order to secure a system, intrusion detection, policy creation, social engineering, DoS attacks, buffer overflows and virus creation. Completed CEH practice exams will provide guidelines to recommended concentrated areas of study required to pass the exam.  1 lecture/laboratory hour.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in COMP 340 
  
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    COMP 350 - ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning)


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will engage students in an interactive learning process that explores the real challenges and opportunities in the effective use, implementation, and customization of ERP systems. Learn about the value of integrated business processes in an ERP system. Become familiar with how ERP business processes, work flows, and SPIs (Application Programming Interfaces) are used to tightly integrate the organizational supply chain. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    COMP 410 - Data Security and Disaster Recovery


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course provides students with the fundamentals of Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity, with an emphasis on Data Security. Students will learn how to plan and prepare both Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity Plans. The process of risk identification, mitigation of risk, along with identification of critical systems and vital organization data will be covered in this course. BCDR Plans will be created using industry standard project methodology.  3 lecture hours.

  
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    COMP 420 - Special Topics/Current Topics


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course examines the current needs of businesses in the Information Technology field. Some of the latest topics may include E-Commerce, Storage Service Providers, Wireless Networks, Business Support and Business Intelligence, and Data Warehouses. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    COMP 440 - Data Warehousing and Business Intelligence


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course provides an introduction to data warehouse design, data modeling and database access. This course will engage students in an interactive environment where issues in data warehouse planning, design, implementation, and administration are experienced. BI (Business Intelligence) and the role it plays within the organization will be covered, as well as identifying and reporting of KPI (Key Performance Indicators) for organizational reporting. 3 lecture hours.


Computer Science

  
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    CSCI 126 - Introduction to Computer Tools for Scientists and Engineers


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    An introduction to the use of MATLAB to display data, produce graphs, solve problems, and determine relationships between experimental data. Matrix calculations will be used to solve systems of equations. Physics and Engineering problems will be modeled using the appropriate software tools. Course materials will be accessed using the Internet. 4 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Prior completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 102  and MATH 104  or higher math with a C or better grade or CPTS score of CLM 55.
  
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    CSCI 159 - C Programming for Scientists and Engineers


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    An introductory course in computer programming using the C language under the Linux operating system. Emphasis will be given to the structured approach to programming to solve scientific problems. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in MATH 102  or higher math.
  
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    CSCI 280 - Discrete Structures


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Discrete Structures will provide students with advanced knowledge of mathematical skills appropriate for STEM majors, such as Computer Science, Engineering, and Mathematics. Topics such as sets, numbers, algorithms, logic, computer arithmetic, applied modern algebra, combinations, recursion principles, graph theory, trees, discrete probability, and digraphs are covered. Students will develop Computer Science foundational knowledge, the ability to recognize Computer Science Themes and Principles, as well as develop effective problem solving and critical thinking skills.  3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for MATH 115 .

Computer Web Technology

  
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    CWEB 151 - Introduction to Web Graphics and Tools


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This is an in-depth course on Adobe’s powerful web graphics and publishing tools. Students will learn from best practices methodology to common tasks such as: migrating sites to Dreamweaver, optimizing images, and creating dynamic content. Students will plan and create a project using Site Definition; including templates, assets, and libraries; customizing and extending Dreamweaver. Fireworks will be used to create and optimize graphics editing; working with bitmaps and vectors; creating navigation objects; batch-processing images; optimizing images for faster page loading. Other aspects of Web Pages covered include using tables, layers, style sheets; using image place holders; building navigation interface; and adding interactive behaviors. 4 lecture/laboratory hours.

  
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    CWEB 213 - Web-Based Electronic Commerce


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    A study in the fundamentals of Web-Based Electronic Commerce by providing an introduction to business over the Internet and World Wide Web which includes project planning, marketing, customer service, and business plan development. The course will focus on how electronic Commerce is carried out, including marketing, web design, and retailing, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of this form of commerce and some of the infrastructures that are in place to support this type of business. No prior experience in the use of computers or Web page design is required. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

  
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    CWEB 220 - Web Application Development


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course introduces students to creating dynamic and data-driven Web applications. Students will learn creating dynamic content and integrating web applications with popular database management systems. Topics include validating forms, accessing database data, securing web sites, using Master pages, and creating navigation systems. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in COMP 107  and COMP 185 .

Construction Technology

  
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    CNST 100 - Construction Seminar


    1 hr (Sem I)
    A course designed to expose students to recent trends in the residential construction industry. Information is presented concerning materials, occupations and professional organizations within the industry. Guest speakers provide such information when available. 1 hour lecture.

  
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    CNST 105 - Framing


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    A course devoted to rough framing. It includes building codes, floor framing, wall framing, roof framing, stair framing and general use of the steel square. Information on types and methods of construction will be presented in the classroom. The laboratory section will provide opportunities to practice framing in mock-up situations. Field trips will be scheduled if houses in rough framing construction are available. 2 lecture hours

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 , or higher; and must qualify for MATT 107  or MATH 022 , or higher. Corequisite(s): CNST 105L .
  
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    CNST 105L - Framing Laboratory


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    This course involves hands-on activities that are directly related to CNST 105 . The course emphasizes building layout, floor framing and layout, wall framing and layout, roof framing and layout, and shingling applications. 4 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): CNST 105 .
  
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    CNST 120 - Construction Safety


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course focuses on safety practices to be followed during construction. Emphasis is placed on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s Safety and Health Standards for the construction industry. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 , or higher.
  
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    CNST 155 - Electrical Wiring


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    Information is given regarding installing and connecting component parts of residential wiring in a manner which is workable and acceptable according to the national electrical code. 2 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 , or higher. Corequisite(s): CNST 155L .
  
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    CNST 155L - Electrical Wiring Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem II)
    This course involves hands-on activities that are directly related to CNST 155 . These activities include the following wiring applications: Wiring of single pole switches, 3-way switches, 4-way switches, split wired receptacles, duplex receptacles, and service panel wiring applications. 2 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): CNST 155 .
  
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    CNST 160 - Finish Carpentry


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    Students are introduced to products and instructed in their applications in the residential building industry. Instruction includes wall covering, floor covering, ceilings, paint, hardware, millwork, specialty products, doors and windows. 2 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 , or higher; and qualify for MATT 107  or MATH 022 , or higher. Corequisite(s): CNST 160L .
  
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    CNST 160L - Finish Carpentry Laboratory


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    This course involves hands-on activities that are directly related to CNST 160 . These activities include: Drywall hanging and finishing, interior painting, wallpapering, installation of door and window casing, installation of base board and crown molding, ceramic wall tile installation, and the installation of exterior siding components. 4 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): CNST 160 .
  
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    CNST 180 - Concrete and Masonry


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    Students plan foundation, footings, walks, and driveways. They are instructed on the types of bonds and materials used to construct walls. Composition of the materials is also covered. 2 lecture hours.

    Corequisite(s): CNST 180L .
  
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    CNST 180L - Concrete and Masonry Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I)
    This course involves hands-on activities that are directly related to CNST 180 . These activities include: Concrete flat work placement/finishing and forming, laying concrete block in varying pattern bonds, and laying brick in varying pattern bonds. 2 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): CNST 180 .
  
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    CNST 205 - Residential House Construction I


    7 hrs (Sem I)
    The first of two courses in house construction. Details of residential house construction will be covered including foundation installation, floor and wall framing, roofing insulation, wiring, door and window installation. Students will be given necessary on-the-job experiences to understand the problems of the use of materials and equipment. Houses will be constructed as a result of these courses. 22 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CNST 105 , CNST 120 , CNST 155 , and CNST 160 .
  
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    CNST 220 - Construction Internship


    1-6 hrs (Sem I, II, Summer)
    This course will provide an internship with a construction company for qualified students. The internship will be supervised by the program chair and employer. Students will receive first-hand experience in the construction industry. Students will be required to write a report about the internship experience.  The employer will provide an evaluation of student performance.  Students will acquire one (1) college credit per 64 practicum hours, with a maximum of six (6) college credits for 384 practicum hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in all first-year construction courses or approval of Construction Program Coordinator.
  
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    CNST 250 - Residential House Construction II


    7 hrs (Sem II)
    A continuation of CNST 205 , including interior and exterior finish. 22 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CNST 205 .
  
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    CNST 256 - Mechanical Systems


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will cover the various HVAC, electrical and water systems that are used in residential and light commercial construction. Additional topics will include sprinkler systems, insulation and moisture control. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    CNST 257 - Site Supervision


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course studies the duties and responsibilities required to supervise residential and light commercial construction sites. Emphasis will be placed on organizational skills, quality control, labor management and job site safety. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    CNST 258 - Building Law and Contracts


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course covers how the law applies to residential and light commercial construction sites. Emphasis will be placed on the legal documents involved in the construction industry such as; contracts, sub-contracts, change orders and job specifications. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    CNST 259 - Construction Costs and Scheduling


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will cover job costs and job scheduling related to residential and light commercial construction. Topics will include hard costs, labor costs, labor burden, profit and markups. Job site scheduling will include both manual and computerized methods. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    CNST 261 - The Indiana Residential Code for One-and Two-Family Dwellings


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    A course devoted to the understanding and interpretation of the Indiana Residential Code for one- and two-family dwellings. Instruction will be given in the following areas, but not limited to, administrative requirements, definitions, building planning, foundations, floors, wall construction, wall coverings, roof and ceiling construction, and roof assemblies. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 , or higher.
  
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    CNST 262 - International Building Code


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    A course devoted to the understanding and interpretation of the International Building Code. Instruction will be given in the following areas, but not limited to, administrative requirements, definitions, building planning, foundations, floors, wall construction, wall coverings, roof and ceiling construction, and roof assemblies. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 , or higher.
  
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    CNST 265 - Cabinetmaking and Millwork


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    Instruction is given on those machines most likely found in a mill workshop and emphasis is placed on development of skills to the highest degree in tool operation. Information is given on the parts that constitute various types of casework. Laboratory time is available to develop skills in tool set-up and operation as well as construction and assembly of cabinet parts. 2 lecture hours.

    Corequisite(s): CNST 265L .
  
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    CNST 265L - Cabinetmaking and Millwork Laboratory


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    This course involves hands-on activities that are directly related to CNST 265 . These activities include: Learning wood working machines and their operation; machine safety; and learning various wood joinery. Students will be required to make a woodworking project as a requirement. 4 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): CNST 265 .
  
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    CNST 270 - Construction Estimating, Labor Rating and Pricing


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    Students will estimate the materials, produce labor rates, and include pricing for a variety of assignments. Making material price comparisons and a complete estimate of a house are required projects. 2 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ENGL 101 ; and students must qualify for MATT 107  or MATH 022 , or higher.  Students must be second year students in a construction technology major. Corequisite(s): CNST 270L .
  
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    CNST 270L - Construction Estimating, Labor Rating and Pricing Laboratory


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    Activities include determining material quantities, prices, and labor costs for the following areas: Building permits and fees, site development/preparation, building layout, footings, foundations, floor framing, wall framing, roof framing, interior finishing, and exterior finishes. 4 laboratory hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Corequisite(s): CNST 270 . This course involves hands-on activities that are directly related to CNST 270 .
  
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    CNST 272 - Portfolio Development


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will require the student to develop a resume, keep a digital record (photos or video recordings) of his acquired skills and prepare for job interviews. 2 lecture hours.

  
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    CNST 300 - Principles of Construction Management


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course provides an overview of subjects that pertain to the role of a construction manager.  Subjects covered will include quality, project, business, and administration/company management.  3 lecture hours.

  
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    CNST 421 - Facilities Management


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will study the electronics, hydraulic, pneumatic and the HVAC operations of small and large facilities and their technology. Included will be a “smart building” system and building diagnostics as well as preventive maintenance, “right to know” laws, codes and regulatory laws affecting the operation of facilities. 3 lecture hours.


Corrections

  
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    CORR 100 - Survey of Corrections


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Emphasis will be placed on the American Correctional System and the subsystems that comprise it. The major components of the American Correctional System are introduced from historical, structural, functional, and current crisis perspectives. Alternative future directions will also be explored. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    CORR 130 - Correctional Facilities


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Orientation will be directed toward the history and current status of both adult and juvenile correctional institutions. The course direction will include institutional policies and programs, the correctional institution as a community, goals and functions of correctional facilities, and administrative problems common to correctional facilities. Reports and forms commonly used in the correctional institution will also be utilized. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    CORR 215 - Community-Based Corrections


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will examine community-based correctional options that punish, monitor, supervise, treat, employ, and reintegrate offenders in community settings.  Emphasis will be placed on the various community-based programs in relation to specific offender groups.  Examination of the relationships between community-based corrections with the different entities of the criminal justice system and the effectiveness of modern day community-based corrections will be explored.  Report writing skills within community based corrections will be developed. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    CORR 235 - Case Management in Corrections


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will examine treatment techniques and processes in adult and juvenile corrections. Specialized counseling methods and services, as well as techniques of prevention will be discussed, in addition to skill development in interviewing, group processes, and crisis intervention. Emphasis will be placed on understanding what treatment options are available as it pertains to the individual offender’s needs. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    CORR 255 - Internship in Corrections


    3 hrs (Sem II, Summer)
    This course will allow students the practical experiences in agencies involved with the correctional system. These agencies may include courts, probation, parole, juvenile detention facilities, community-based facilities, and other correctional institutions or other correctional agencies as approved and recommended by the instructor. Students will be required to complete 150 internship hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A Public Safety Major and completion of 30 credit hours.

Cosmetology

  
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    COSM 100 - Cosmetology I


    7 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course offers an introduction to cosmetology with emphasis on basic practical skills and theories including roller control, quick styling, shampooing, hair coloring, permanent waving, facials, manicuring, business and personal ethics, and bacteriology and sanitation. Successful completion of the course requires at least 375 Cosmetology studio hours. 3 lecture hours, 26 studio hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 .
  
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    COSM 150 - Cosmetology II


    7 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Development of practical skills introduced in COSM 100  will receive the greatest emphasis in this course. Clinical application and theory in the science of cosmetology are introduced. Successful completion of the course requires at least 375 Cosmetology studio hours. 3 lecture hours, 26 studio hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in COSM 100 .
  
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    COSM 200 - Cosmetology III


    7 hrs (Sem I, II)
    The emphasis will be toward the development of advanced skills in styling, hair coloring, permanent waving, facials and manicuring. Students will also study anatomy and physiology as it applies to cosmetology. Successful completion of the course requires at least 375 Cosmetology studio hours. 3 lecture hours, 26 studio hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in COSM 150 .
  
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    COSM 250 - Cosmetology IV


    7 hrs (Sem I, II)
    All previously developed skills are applied with emphasis on developing individual techniques. Professionalism, salon management, psychology in relation to cosmetology, and preparation for state board examination are stressed. Successful completion of the course requires at least 375 Cosmetology studio hours. 5 lecture hours, 26 studio hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in COSM 200 .
  
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    COSM 275 - Comprehensive Cosmetology


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course is designed exclusively for students who have successfully completed 1,500 hours of beauty school instruction at another institution. Students will be evaluated to determine if any area exists in which students need further instruction. The course is organized so students can advance at their own pace. Comprehensive Cosmetology is an attempt to assure that transfer students meet the standards set for our regular cosmetology students.


Culinary Arts

  
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    CULN 110 - Quantity Food Production


    5 hrs (Sem I)
    This course is an introduction to basic food preparation; use, care and handling of tools and equipment; and the perishable commodity. Preparation and presentation of soups, sauces, vegetables, entrees and salads using a variety of cooking and preparation techniques will be covered. Professionalism in chef presentation and behaviors will be stressed. 7 class hours.

  
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    CULN 150 - Advanced Quantity Food Production


    5 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will include the preparation and presentation of soups, sauces, vegetables, entrees and salads at a higher level than CULN 110 . There will be a strong emphasis on advanced food production techniques. Students will also focus on portion control and plate design presentations. 7 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CULN 110 .
  
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    CULN 161 - Introduction to Baking


    5 hrs (Sem II)
    This course introduces the student to the way baking works through an understanding of the ingredients used in baking and pastry.  Students will learn by producing various baked goods such as cookies, brownies, pies, basic yeast dough, various frostings and fillings, and traditional cakes.  7 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CULN 110 .
  
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    CULN 210 - Pastry and Bake Shop Production


    5 hrs (Sem I)
    This is an in-depth study of the production and presentation of bakery, pastry, and specialty bakeshop items. Included are yeast products, puff pastry, sweet rolls and fillings, cakes and cake decorating, European tortes, candies, and specialty items for special occasions and buffets. Students will also be exposed to tools and equipment used in the bakeshop and management of the bakery. 7 class hours.

  
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    CULN 215 - Supervision of the Quantity Food Facility


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Often the chef or executive chef serves as the manager and supervisor of the quantity food facility. This course examines managerial techniques including motivational techniques, delegation and supervision of work assignments, public relations, and management theory application. 3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

  
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    CULN 220 - Fundamental Skills and Techniques in Pastry


    5 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will build on the skills learned in CULN 161 - Introduction to Baking .  Students will produce additional varieties of yeast breads.  A strong emphasis will be placed on decorating techniques, European-style tortes, individual desserts, ice cream, custards, proper use of pure chocolate, and molded candies.  7 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CULN 161 .
  
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    CULN 230 - Nutrition for the Food Service Professional


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will focus on the nutritional elements that a chef must consider when developing a menu for a restaurant, banquets, catered events, etc. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    CULN 245 - Advanced Baking and Pastry Production


    5 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will focus on mastery of advanced baking and pastry skills needed for pastry buffet presentation, wedding cake design, tiered and themed decorated cakes, and chocolate artistry.  Large batch production will be included and these products will be used in the Culinary Arts Program’s evening dinners.  7 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CULN 220 .
  
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    CULN 250 - Off-Site Catering


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    Students will be involved in catering events in other buildings on campus and/or off-campus for various venues. 3 class hours.

  
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    CULN 260 - Haute Cuisine and Special Food Items


    5 hrs (Sem II)
    This is an intensive laboratory course stressing the refinement of quantity food skills, decorating skills, specialty recipes, and front of the house skills. In addition, the preparation and presentation of classical foods and cuisine, banquet, buffet, specialty appetizers, and special occasions, will be included. Students will learn front and back of the house skills by serving dinners to the public in the dining room. 7 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CULN 110  and CULN 150 .
  
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    CULN 270 - Culinary Practicum


    2 hrs (Summer)
    This practicum consists of a minimum of 300 hours employment in an approved position in the hotel and restaurant industry in a food preparation capacity. While faculty will visit during the work experience, students will be under the supervision of the employer who will evaluate, grade, and document the students’ progress. Minimum of 300 practicum hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of the first year of the program.
  
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    CULN 285 - Advanced Culinary Artistry


    10 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This class will offer advanced culinary artistry techniques for both savory and sweet foods. The class instruction will include hors d’oeuvres, canapés, appetizers, charcuterie, cheese making, international foods, buffet design, advanced cake decorating, candies and confections, plated dessert presentations, international desserts, frozen desserts, and display centerpieces. 14 class hours.


Diesel Ag-Technology

  
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    DEER 150 - John Deere Tech Commercial and Consumer Products


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    Instruction presents theory and work activities relating to diagnostic procedures, adjustments and parts repair or replacement in law and grounds care equipment as well as skid steer loaders, chain saws and gas trimmers. Major emphasis on John Deere equipment. 2 lecture hours.

    Corequisite(s): DEER 150L .
  
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    DEER 150L - John Deere Tech Commercial and Consumer Products Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem II)
    This course involves hands-on activities relating to diagnostic procedures, adjustments, and parts repair or replacement in lawn and grounds care equipment as well as skid steer loaders, chain saws, and gas trimmers. Major emphasis is placed on John Deere equipment. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): DEER 150 .
  
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    DEER 161 - Agricultural Machinery


    1 hr (Sem I)
    The study of the operation and design of various agricultural equipment to include tillage, planting and harvesting equipment. Students will perform adjustment and maintenance activities using appropriate service manuals. 1 lecture hour.

    Corequisite(s): DEER 161L .
  
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    DEER 161L - Agricultural Machinery Laboratory


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    This course involves hands-on activities relating to agricultural equipment including tillage, planting, and harvesting equipment. Students will perform adjustment and maintenance activities using appropriate service programs. 6 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): DEER 161 .
  
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    DEER 190 - Cooperative Work Experience


    3 hrs (Summer)
    Students will be employed ten weeks at sponsoring dealerships. This time will be during the summer between the first and second year. Designated objectives, agreed upon by Vincennes University, the dealership and students will be assigned by the dealership. VU faculty will visit dealerships during this time to check on progress on objectives. A minimum of 400 hours of on-the-job training is required.

  
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    DEER 237 - Advanced Hydraulics


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    An advanced study of hydraulics, system flows and circuits of current and older equipment as well as radial and axial piston pumps, electro-hydraulic valves, and the use of test equipment to solve problems on current agricultural equipment. Theory and operation are to be explained. Major emphasis on John Deere equipment. 3 lecture hours.

    Corequisite(s): DEER 237L .
  
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    DEER 237L - Advanced Hydraulics Laboratory


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    This course involves hands-on activities related to hydraulic system flows and circuits of current and older equipment as well as radial and axial piston pumps, electro-hydraulic valves; and the use of test equipment to solve problems on current agricultural equipment. Major emphasis is placed on John Deere equipment. 6 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): DEER 237 .
  
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    DEER 270 - Advanced Diagnostics


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Course addresses John Deere advanced electrical and hydraulic diagnostics. This course also includes component and system diagnostics for global positioning systems. 3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Corequisite(s): DEER 270L .
  
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    DEER 270L - Advanced Diagnostics Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I)
    This course involves hands-on activities that are directly related to advanced electrical and hydraulic diagnostics as well as component and system diagnostics for global positioning systems. Major emphasis is placed on John Deere equipment. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): DEER 270 .

Diesel, Truck and Heavy Equipment Mechanics Technology

  
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    DESL 110 - Diesel Electrical


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course addresses the fundamental theories of electricity and electronics as applied to diesel and heavy equipment. Diagnosis and repair of basic battery, starting, charging, lighting, accessories, and wiring systems will be covered. Utilization of analog and digital meters, wiring diagrams, and other diagnostic tools will be stressed. 3 lecture hours.

    Corequisite(s): DESL 110L  
  
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    DESL 110L - Diesel Electrical Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I)
    This course is a hands-on course that introduces the student to diesel and heavy equipment electrical theory, batteries, charging systems, starting systems, wiring repairs, lighting systems and accessories. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): DESL 110  
 

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