Apr 20, 2021  
2019-2020 Vincennes University Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Vincennes University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM

The course numbering system is alpha-numeric, consisting of four letters and three numbers. The letters indicate the subject area of the course. Developmental courses have a zero as the initial digit. Freshman level courses carry numbers between 100 and 199. Sophomore courses are numbered 200 to 299. Junior and senior level courses carry numbers between 300 and 499.

Speaking and Writing Reading Intensive courses are indicated in the course description section of this catalog.

Listing for Special Instruction Courses. Vincennes University offers instruction tailored to the needs of special populations. The instruction is individualized to the particular needs of the business or industry, with emphasis that the content be college level. The following courses are established to permit flexibility within established credit hour designations.

 

Biology

  
  •  

    BIOL 105 - Principles of Biology I


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course is part one of an integrated approach to studying living organisms. Topics will include genetics, cytology, respiration, photosynthesis, and ecology. This course is required of agricultural, biology, and medical science majors. This course is a transferIN course. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101  and MATH 102 ; and a grade of C or better or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 103 /103L  or CHEM 105 /105L . Corequisite(s): BIOL 105L .
  
  •  

    BIOL 105L - Principles of Biology Laboratory I


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Explores principles of BIOL 105 . This course is a transferIN course. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): BIOL 105 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 106 - Principles of Biology II


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course is part two of an integrated approach to studying living organisms. Topics will include evolution, living organism domains and kingdoms, plant morphology and physiology, development, and animal morphology and physiology. This course is a transferIN course. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in BIOL 105  and BIOL 105L . Corequisite(s): BIOL 106L .
  
  •  

    BIOL 106L - Principles of Biology Laboratory II


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Explores principles of BIOL 106 . This course is a transferIN course. 3 laboratory hours.

    Writing Reading Intensive Course

    Corequisite(s): BIOL 106 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 107 - Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    The study of basic human body structure and function. Emphasis on interdependence of systems and contributions of each system to the maintenance of a healthy body. Intended primarily for students in the Practical Nursing and Emergency Medical Services programs, the Biomedical Technician Concentration of Electronics Technology program, and the Funeral Service program. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 ; and must qualify for MATH 013  or MATT 107 , or higher. Corequisite(s): BIOL 107L .
  
  •  

    BIOL 107L - Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I)
    Examines the principles of BIOL 107  through lab exercises, models, slides, and animal dissections. 2 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): BIOL 107 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 108 - Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology I


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course is a study of human anatomy and physiology through a systems approach with an emphasis on homeostatic mechanisms. Units include cells, tissues, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and endocrine systems. This course assumes the student will have adequate computer skills and access to the Internet and recommended hardware. BIOL 108 is intended primarily for Health Information Management certificate programs and does not satisfy the Laboratory Science general education requirement for the A.S. or A.A. degrees. Students not in the named certificate programs should consult their advisor as to the appropriateness of BIOL 108 as an Anatomy and Physiology course in their major. Internet Delivery Only. 3 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 ; and must qualify for MATH 013  or MATT 107 , or higher.
  
  •  

    BIOL 109 - Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology II


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course is a continuance of the study of human anatomy and physiology. Units of study include circulatory, respiratory, immune, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. This course assumes the student will have adequate computer skills and access to the Internet and recommended hardware. BIOL 109 is intended primarily for Health Information Management certificate programs and does not satisfy the general education laboratory science requirement for the A.S. or A.A. degrees. Students not in the named certificate programs should consult their advisor as to the appropriateness of BIOL 109 as an anatomy and physiology course in their major. Internet Delivery Only. 3 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in BIOL 108 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 111 - Anatomy and Physiology I


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Introduction to human body structure and function. Cells, tissues, integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, general and special senses. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 ; and must qualify for MATH 013  or MATT 107 , or higher. Successful completion of high school biology and chemistry are strongly recommended. Corequisite(s): BIOL 111L .
  
  •  

    BIOL 111L - Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Examines principles of BIOL 111  through lab exercises, models, slides, animal dissection, and computer simulations. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): BIOL 111 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 112 - Anatomy and Physiology II


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course covers the following aspects of human anatomy and physiology: blood; cardiovascular system; respiratory system; digestive system; urinary system: endocrine system; male and female reproductive systems; and basic embryology. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in BIOL 111  and BIOL 111L . Corequisite(s): BIOL 112L .
  
  •  

    BIOL 112L - Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory II


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Examines principles of BIOL 112  through lab exercises, models, slides, animal dissection, and computer simulations. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): BIOL 112 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 131 - Biology Explorations


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    This course is intended for students considering a major in Biology. It is meant to engage students in their academic program and the college. Students will participate in unique research projects involving ecology, evolution, genetics, cells, or molecular biology. The goals of the course are to give students a sense of community, explore biological problems in a team-based setting, develop important scientific and critical thinking skills, introduce students to academic resources available at the college, and explore potential career fields.  Students with credit in CHEM 131 - Chemistry Explorations  or GEOS 131 - Geoscience Explorations  may NOT receive credit for BIOL 131 . 3 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 ; and must qualify for MATH 016  or MATT 107 , or higher.
  
  •  

    BIOL 200 - Heredity and Society


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Introduction to principles of human heredity and genetic expression. Genetic diseases, history and use of prenatal diagnostic technologies and ethical dilemmas posed by these advances. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ENGL 101 . One semester of any college level biology course is recommended.
  
  •  

    BIOL 205 - Survey of Microbiology


    4 hrs (Summer)
    This course is an introduction to microbial morphology, staining principles, metabolism, growth and pathogenicity. In addition, students will learn common infectious diseases in each body system, and examine the role of microbes in tissue decomposition, as well as various physical and chemical means of microbial control. This course was designed to meet the requirements of the Funeral Service degree program. This course is offered through Distance Education only. 4 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHEM 110 / 110L  or CHEM 101 /CHEM 101L , and BIOL 107 /BIOL 107L  or BIOL 108  and BIOL 109 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 208 - Microbiology for the Health Sciences


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course is the study of microorganisms with an emphasis on the clinical setting and disease. Topics will include the basics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular structures and functions, chemistry in terms of metabolism and biochemical testing, epidemiology, and the disease process. This course is a transferIN course. 3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in BIOL 107 /BIOL 107L  or BIOL 111 /BIOL 111L ; and CHEM 100 . (A year of high school chemistry with a grade of C or better, taken within the last 7 years, may be substituted for CHEM 100.) Corequisite(s): BIOL 208L .
  
  •  

    BIOL 208L - Microbiology for the Health Sciences Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Explores the principles of BIOL 208 . Emphasis on the safe handling, identification, and control of microorganisms. This course is a transferIN course. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): BIOL 208 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 211 - Human Systems I: Anatomy and Physiology


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course is a study of human function, emphasizing physiology of human tissues and systems. Relevant aspects of anatomy and histology are also included. The application of elements of anatomy and physiology to medical practices provides a rationale for prediction of symptoms and treatment of diseases. Topics include histophysiology of cells and tissues, and the anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous system. 3 lecture hours.

    Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in BIOL 105 /BIOL 105L . Corequisite(s): BIOL 211L  
  
  •  

    BIOL 211L - Human Systems I: Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I)
    Examines the principles of BIOL 211 . 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): BIOL 211 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 212 - Human Systems II: Anatomy and Physiology


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Topics covered include anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, endocrine, digestive, urinary, reproductive systems, and embryology. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in BIOL 211  and BIOL 211L . Corequisite(s): BIOL 212L .
  
  •  

    BIOL 212L - Human Systems II: Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem II)
    Examines the principles of BIOL 212 . 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): BIOL 212 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 220 - Molecular Biology


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    The course studies the structure and function of important biological molecules with emphasis on the nucleic acids and proteins. Topics will include DNA structure, replication, mutation, repair, transcription, translation, transposition, and gene regulation. Other topics covered will include plasmids, bacteriophages and the principles of recombinant DNA technology. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in BIOL 105 /BIOL 105L .
  
  •  

    BIOL 220L - Laboratory in Molecular Biology


    1 hr (Sem II)
    Lab work includes experiments that are useful for scientists who are just beginning to move into the molecular biology field. Experiments introduce the basic skills of molecular biology, microbiological techniques, restriction digestion of DNA, gel electrophoresis of both DNA and proteins, and genetic engineering.  2 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): BIOL 220 
  
  •  

    BIOL 223 - Principles of Ecology and Evolution


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will study ecological processes and dynamics of populations, communities, and ecosystems. This will include factors regulating population and community structure, case studies, field studies, and simulation models of life history attributes. Evolutionary principles of natural selection, taxonomy, adaptation, and speciation will be covered as well as other evolutionary impacts on nature and society. 3 lecture hours.

    Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in BIOL 105 /BIOL 105L . Corequisite(s): BIOL 223L .
  
  •  

    BIOL 223L - Principles of Ecology and Evolution Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I)
    Explores principles of BIOL 223.  Laboratories emphasize critical thinking and the scientific process. 2 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): BIOL 223 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 230 - General Microbiology


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course serves as an introduction to the nature and activities of microorganisms. Topics will emphasize the role of microorganisms in nature, their genetics, and metabolism, including a detailed consideration of the immune system. This course is designed for majors and preprofessional majors. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in BIOL 105  and BIOL 105L . Corequisite(s): BIOL 230L .
  
  •  

    BIOL 230L - General Microbiology Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I)
    Explores principles of BIOL 230 . Emphasis on microscope techniques, culturing, identification, and control of microorganisms. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): BIOL 230 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 233 - Field Studies in Biology


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    This course will study the ecology and natural history covered in the field. Animals, plants, and geology will be studied and their interrelationships investigated. The course will be offered in the appropriate area (mountains, desert, tropical forest, or seashore and ocean). Two in-class meetings will be scheduled prior to the trip for presentations.  3 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor consent
  
  •  

    BIOL 301 - Science, Society, and You


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course will explore the scientific process and how it intersects with social issues, research ethics, technology, politics, and government. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in any 100-level or higher BIOL, CHEM, CHMT, GEOS, PHYS, PHYT, or PSCI course.
  
  •  

    BIOL 308 - Genetics


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Inheritance in populations, organisms, cells and viruses. Research paper on a current topic in Genetics or in teaching methodologies is required. 3 lecture hours.

    Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in BIOL 105  and BIOL 105L . Corequisite(s): BIOL 308L .
  
  •  

    BIOL 308L - Genetics Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem II)
    Explores principles of BIOL 308.  Laboratories emphasize critical thinking and the scientific process. 2 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): BIOL 308 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 310 - Cellular Biology


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Analysis of structure and function of cellular membranes and organelles; overview of organic macromolecules and major metabolic pathways of plant and animal cells. Other topics include a survey of signal transduction systems in the cell, regulation of gene expression, and bioenergetics. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in BIOL 105 , BIOL 105L , CHEM 315  and CHEM 315L .
  
  •  

    BIOL 318 - Developmental Biology


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Analysis of developmental processes that lead to the construction of whole organisms from single cells. Includes the principles of embryology and analysis of mutations affecting development. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in BIOL 308 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 360 - Immunology


    3 hrs (Summer)
    This course will teach students the basic principles of Immunology. These basic principles will allow them to understand causes of immunological diseases including immunodeficiency disorders, HIV, autoimmune diseases, and hypersensitivity reactions. Also, students will be exposed to the basic concepts associated with immunotherapy and immunoprophylasix and principles of gene therapy and transplantation immunology. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHEM 326 .
  
  •  

    BIOL 423 - Ecology and Evolution


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    The study of ecological processes and dynamics of populations, communities, and ecosystems; physical, physiological, behavioral, and population genetic factors regulating population and community structure; case studies, field studies, and simulation models of life history attributes, competition, predation, parasitism, and mutualism. Evolutionary principles of natural selection, taxonomy, adaptation, and speciation will be covered as well as evolution at the molecular, reproductive, and social levels. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in BIOL 106  and BIOL 106L . Corequisite(s): BIOL 423L .
  
  •  

    BIOL 423L - Evolution and Ecology Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I)
    Explores principles of BIOL 423.  Laboratories emphasize critical thinking and the scientific process. 2 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): BIOL 423 .

Biomedical Electronics Technology

  
  •  

    BIOM 200 - Biomedical Electronics I


    6 hrs (Sem I)
    An initial course containing information of medical terminology, hospital systems and safety, basic transducers, safety analyzers, and biomedical electronic equipment and test equipment operation and maintenance. Students are introduced to medical and patient interfacing devices. Diagnostic, monitoring and treatment devices are covered. Included are laboratory exercises consisting of the operation, preventive maintenance, and troubleshooting of biomedical systems. Special emphasis is placed on safety issues, such as ground potentials, and intermachine potentials. 3 lecture hours, 9 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ELEC 151 .
  
  •  

    BIOM 250 - Biomedical Electronics II


    6 hrs (Sem II)
    This course is an advanced continuation of the study of biomedical equipment, which measure biopotentials including the ECG Waveform. A hands-on approach is taken with emphasis on medical devices which include therapeutic equipment, vital signs monitoring systems, RF Telemetry theory and equipment. Infusion delivery systems, stress testing systems, Electro-surgical equipment, Infant Monitoring systems and an overview of various imaging systems. 3 lecture hours, 9 laboratory hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ENGL 101  and BIOM 200 ; and a grade of C or better in COMM 143  or COMM 148 .
  
  •  

    BIOM 290 - Biomedical Internship


    2 hrs (Summer)
    This optional internship will be conducted in cooperation with area biomedical electronic repair facilities.  Students will engage in preventive maintenance, repair, and calibration of biomedical equipment under the supervision of the institution’s biomedical technicians.  A minimum of 200 internship hours is required.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in BIOM 200 , and a C or better in or concurrent enrollment in BIOM 250 

Business Finance

  
  •  

    FINC 100 - Introduction to Financial Institutions


    3 hrs
    An orientation to bank operations, including the various bank functions and an elementary description to their operation. An overview of the banking field. 3 lecture hours.

  
  •  

    FINC 205 - Money and Banking


    3 hrs
    This course presents the basic economic principles most closely related to the subject of money and banking in a context of topics of interest to present and prospective bank management. The course stresses the practical application of the economics of money and banking to the individual bank. Some of the subjects covered include structure of the commercial banking system, banks and the money supply, bank investments and loans, the Federal Reserve System and its policies, and the international monetary system. 3 lecture hours.

  
  •  

    FINC 220 - Credit and Collections


    3 hrs
    Techniques of installment lending with emphasis on establishing credit, servicing a loan, collecting amounts due, and checking information. Other areas covered may include inventory financing, special loan programs, business development and advertising, and public relations aspects of installment lending. 3 lecture hours.

  
  •  

    FINC 230 - Real Estate Finance


    3 hrs
    This course approaches the subject from the viewpoint of the mortgage loan officer who seeks to develop a sound mortgage portfolio. A picture of the mortgage market is presented first, then acquisition of a mortgage portfolio, mortgage plans and procedures, mortgage loan processing and servicing, and finally the obligations of the mortgage loan officer in overall portfolio management. 3 lecture hours.

  
  •  

    FINC 245 - Introduction to Investments


    3 hrs
    This class focuses on the essential qualities of good investments, the equilibrium valuation of securities and the institutional characteristics of securities market, including both new issues and secondary markets. Offering comprehensive coverage of analytical aspects of securities valuation especially corporate stock and treasury debt. The class also examines futures, options, and risky debt. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in MATT 109 .

Bowling Industry Management and Technology

  
  •  

    BOWL 101 - Lane and Pinsetter Maintenance I


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course provides an introduction to the principles of lane care and the use of related equipment. At the same time, it also introduces students to the Brunswick Pinsetter, its components, and the most common areas of malfunction. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    BOWL 106 - Lane and Pinsetter Laboratory I


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This laboratory is the working lab in which students actually carries out the normal operations involved with lane care and basic pinsetter maintenance. The course provides the manager with the information needed to interact with and supervise the lane care person and the pinsetter mechanic trained on Brunswick equipment. 6 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    BOWL 151 - Lane and Pinsetter Maintenance II


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course provides an introduction into the use of the lane care equipment and developing lane conditioner patterns and lane maintenance schedules. The course also introduces students to the AMF Pinsetter, its components, and the most common areas of malfunction. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    BOWL 156 - Lane and Pinsetter Laboratory II


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This laboratory is the working lab in which students actually carries out the advanced techniques involved in lane care and conditioner application. In addition, the course provides the manager with the information needed to interact with and supervise the lane care person and the pinsetter mechanic trained on AMF equipment. 6 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    BOWL 205 - Pro Shop Operations and Instruction


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course provides students with the necessary skills to operate the Pro Shop. These skills include hand-measuring, drilling, and sales techniques related to bowling balls. The course introduces students to the fiscal management of the Pro Shop. Students will also acquire a knowledge of the basic techniques of bowling instruction and customer relations. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    BOWL 210 - Bowling Lanes Management I


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    A practical program in the management of the bowling operation. Covers the financial aspect of the operations pertinent to showing profit. 3 lecture hours.

  
  •  

    BOWL 215 - Management and Pro Shop Laboratory I


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    This laboratory is a working lab in which students actually works in the bowling facility doing counter work, operating pro shop equipment in relation to ball sales, drilling, and maintenance. Students will also develop and carry out projects for special events like those required for the operation of a successful facility. 4 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    BOWL 220 - Lineage Development


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Designed to help students develop lineage programs of all types (leagues, tournaments, and special events) and learn all rules and regulations of the American Bowling Congress. Students will be introduced to the techniques for outside sales and marketing to ensure the success of these events. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 , or appropriate placement test scores.
  
  •  

    BOWL 270 - Bowling Lanes Management II


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Continuation of BOWL 210 . Includes all phases of the bowling management operation such as personnel, public relations, and employee expense rates. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    BOWL 275 - Management and Pro Shop Laboratory II


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    This laboratory is a management-directed working lab in which the students will develop projects more related to the business operations of the bowling facility: develop budgets to meet facility scenarios, profit and loss statements, cost analyses of overall operations including not only basic operations, but also of special events and payroll. In addition, the pro shop component will involve practice to improve speed and accuracy of operation and to gain stronger customer relations skills. 4 laboratory hours.


Business Internship

Following the first year of study, a limited number of internship opportunities may be available to qualified students enrolled in any of the Occupational Business programs. These courses may be taken to satisfy the “Elective(s)” requirement found in most programs. Generally, Business Internships will consist of supervised part-time work experience during the summer months. The actual number of Business Internship opportunities may vary considerably from year to year and, consequently, enrollment will be limited. However, students who are already employed or who are anticipating part-time employment should confer with their academic advisors and/or the Internship Coordinator to determine whether their work experience might qualify for Business Internship credit. In any event, the general requirements for all Internships are as follows: (1) the work experience must be closely related to the student’s major area of study; (2) the employer/supervisor at the place of employment must agree to participate in the training and evaluation phases of the internship; (3) the student must work a minimum number of clock hours for each Internship and complete whatever other projects are required by the coordinator; (4) the Internship must be approved by the Internship Coordinator.

  
  •  

    BINT 205 - Business Internship I


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    A minimum of 320 hours of work experience related to the student’s major area of study, periodic reports based on the work experience, and the employer/supervisor’s evaluation are the basic requirements. An end of the semester report and presentation will be required by the student.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
  •  

    BINT 206 - Business Internship II


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    A continuation of BINT 205  and the same requirements for the internship credit apply.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 ; and receive a grade of C or better in BINT 205 .
  
  •  

    BINT 207 - Logistics Internship


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Following the first year of study, the student will participate in internship opportunities. However, students who are already employed or who are anticipating part-time employment should confer with their academic advisors and/or the Internship Coordinator to determine whether their work experience might qualify for Business Internship credit. In any event, the general requirements for Internships are as follows: (1) the work experience must be closely related to the student’s major area of study; (2) the employer/supervisor at the place of employment must agree to participate in the training and evaluation phases of the internship; (3) the student must work a minimum number of clock hours for each Internship and complete a written report on experiences encountered during the internship period (4) the Internship must be approved by the Internship Coordinator. Minimum of 200 practicum hours.


Business Law

  
  •  

    BLAW 200 - Legal and Related Issues in Business


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    The purpose of this course is to develop sensitivity for the numerous legal and related issues in the competitive business world. Case studies are used to examine legal and value systems as a foundation for business decisions. Focus is placed on developing, applying, and evaluating personal values as they impact stakeholders. 3 lecture hours.

  
  •  

    BLAW 201 - Commercial Law I


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    The judicial system, basic concepts of negligence and strict liability, sales law, contract law, and negotiable instruments. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
  •  

    BLAW 202 - Commercial Law II


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Corporation, partnership, trust, and agency law, plus secured transactions and bailments. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
  •  

    BLAW 203 - Legal Environment of Business


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    The course introduces students to concepts of law specifically related to business.  The following areas will be covered:  United States judicial system, government regulation, constitutional law, contracts, torts, common law, antitrust law, and securities regulation.  Students will evaluate business situations and law through a variety of cases to test understanding of law as well as ethics and social responsibility.  3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .

Chemistry

  
  •  

    CHEM 100 - Elementary Chemistry


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    An introduction to the basics of inorganic chemistry with a study of the chemical and physical properties, and changes of matter including measurement, nomenclature, reactions, and stoichiometry, including a discussion of nuclear chemistry. This course is a transferIN course. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for MATH 016  or MATH 022  or higher; and students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 . Corequisite(s): CHEM 100L .
  
  •  

    CHEM 100L - Elementary Chemistry Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Experiments to illustrate concepts of CHEM 100 . This course is a transferIN course. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): CHEM 100 .
  
  •  

    CHEM 101 - Elementary Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    An introduction to basic nomenclature and reactions of organic functional groups, and a brief study of the function, structure, and metabolism of the macromolecules of the living system with an introduction to body fluids. This course is a transferIN course. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 ; and have a grade of C or better in CHEM 100 /100L , or CHEM 103 /103L , or CHEM 111 . Corequisite(s): CHEM 101L . (A full year of high school chemistry may be substituted for CHEM 100 /CHEM 100L  or CHEM 103 /CHEM 103L  or CHEM 111 .)
  
  •  

    CHEM 101L - Elementary Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Experiments to illustrate properties and reactions of organic and biochemical groups. This course is a transferIN course. 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): CHEM 101 .
  
  •  

    CHEM 103 - Introduction to Chemistry


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course is designed for students who want to take CHEM 105  General Chemistry I, but do not have the prerequisites. It teaches the basics of inorganic nomenclature, equation writing, stoichiometry, gas laws and other skills and topics to prepare a student for General Chemistry. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better or concurrent enrollment in MATH 016  or MATH 022  or higher; and students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 . Corequisite(s): CHEM 103L .
  
  •  

    CHEM 103L - Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Examines principles of CHEM 103 ; designed to be taken with CHEM 103 . Emphasizes development of laboratory skills. Experiment topics include the metric system, classes of chemical reactions, gravimetric analysis, titrations, gas laws, and qualitative analysis. Fulfills the lab science requirement for graduation when taken with CHEM 103 . 6 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): CHEM 103 .
  
  •  

    CHEM 104 - Consumer Science


    4 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Course examines the scientific method, metric system of units, basic atomic structure, periodic table and how chemicals are involved in everyday life including foods, medicines, cosmetics, polymers, acids and bases. Laboratory concentrates on common household reactions and simple reaction products commonly found in and around the home and workplace. This course is a transferIN course. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 , or higher; and must qualify for MATH 013  or MATT 017 , or higher.
  
  •  

    CHEM 105 - General Chemistry I


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Laws and principles of chemistry including stoichiometry, gas laws, atomic and molecular structure, nomenclature and equation writing and balancing. Numerical problems and relationships are introduced whenever quantitative treatment is possible. This course is a transferIN course. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in MATH 102  or higher, or EA score of 70 or higher; and students must qualify for ENGL 101 .  (High school chemistry or completion of CHEM 103 /CHEM 103L  with a grade of C or better is required for enrollment in CHEM 105.) Corequisite(s): CHEM 105L 
  
  •  

    CHEM 105L - General Chemistry/Quantitative Analysis Laboratory


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Examines principles of CHEM 105 ; designed to be taken with CHEM 105 . Experiment topics include descriptive chemistry, periodic trends, gravimetric analysis, volumetric analysis, instrumental techniques, gas laws, and identification by qualitative techniques. Fulfills the lab science requirement for graduation when taken with CHEM 105 . This course is a transferIN course. 6 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): CHEM 105 .
  
  •  

    CHEM 106 - General Chemistry II


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Continuation of CHEM 105  with emphasis on Thermochemistry, Electrochemistry, Kinetics, Equilibrium, Behavior of acids, bases, and salts, and Coordination Chemistry. This course is a transferIN course. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHEM 105 ; and MATH 102  or higher or a CPTC score of 55 or higher. Corequisite(s): CHEM 106L  
  
  •  

    CHEM 106L - General Chemistry/Qualitative Analysis Laboratory


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Examines the principles in CHEM 106  with experiments in Thermochemistry, Kinetics, Equilibrium, Behavior of acids, bases, and salts, Thermodynamics and Qualitative Analysis. In qualitative analysis, emphasis will be placed on observations and equation-writing, as well as conclusions. Separate notebooks will be used to record this information. This course is a transferIN course. 6 laboratory hours.

    Writing Reading Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHEM 105  and CHEM 105L . Corequisite(s): CHEM 106 .
  
  •  

    CHEM 107 - World of Chemistry


    4 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course presents a unified view of science and practice of chemistry. It is an introductory college chemistry course for students not majoring in the sciences. It presents a view of the molecular world and the fundamental role it plays in the phenomena we observe in daily life. It also helps students understand the major scientific and technological issues facing all of us as citizens and consumers. The laboratory is performed with chemicals that are available from grocery stores, drug stores or hardware stores and are found in most homes. (Offered through degree completion as an internet course with a laboratory component) 4 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 ; and must qualify for MATT 107  or MATH 022 , or higher.
  
  •  

    CHEM 108 - Chemistry for the Arts


    4 hrs (Sem II)
    Introduction to organic and inorganic chemistry with emphasis on compounds and reactions used in art. Chemistry of silver halides and diazo systems, screen-printing, lithography and flexography; properties of cement, metals, plaster and stones and their reactions. Potential danger of each chemical and its safe use emphasized. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    CHEM 110 - General, Organic and Biochemistry


    4 hrs (Sem l, II)
    Students will learn basic structure, reactions, nomenclature, and physical/chemical properties of inorganic, organic, and biochemical compounds. 4 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 ; and must qualify for MATH 016  or MATH 022 , or higher. Corequisite(s): CHEM 110L  
  
  •  

    CHEM 110L - General, Organic and Biochemistry Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Experiments to illustrate concepts of CHEM 110 . 3 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): CHEM 110  
  
  •  

    CHEM 111 - Chemistry I


    4 hrs (Sem I, II)
    An introductory course that includes the science of chemistry and measurement, atomic theory and the periodic table, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, liquids and solids, gases and the ideal gas law, solutions, and acids and bases. (Offered through degree completion as an internet course with a laboratory component) 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 ; and must qualify for MATH 102 , or higher.
  
  •  

    CHEM 112 - Chemistry of Food Preparation


    4 hrs (Sem I)
    Students will learn basic structure, reactions, nomenclature and physical/chemical properties of inorganic, organic and biochemical compounds and how they apply to the preparation of food and the nutritional value of food. 3 lecture, 2 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 , or higher; and must qualify for MATH 013  or MATT 017 , or higher.
  
  •  

    CHEM 120 - Chemistry of Hazardous Materials


    4 hrs (Sem II)
    Course examines the metric system of units, basic atomic structure, periodic table, nomenclature, physical and chemical properties of salts, inorganic and organic compounds and their basic reactions and hazardous effects. Course includes an in depth study of the 9 classes of hazardous materials as defined by DOT, OSHA, and EPA. Lab concentrates on the properties and reactions involving hazardous materials. 3 lecture, 2 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 , or higher; and must qualify for MATH 013  or MATT 017 , or higher.
  
  •  

    CHEM 131 - Chemistry Explorations


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    This course is intended for students considering a major in Chemical Sciences. It is meant to engage students in their academic program and the college. Students will participate in research projects involving chemistry, biochemistry, pharmacology, food science or environmental health science. The goals of the course are to give students a sense of community, explore problems in a team-based setting, develop important scientific and critical thinking skills, introduce students to academic resources available at the college, and explore potential career fields. Students with credit in BIOL 131 - Biology Explorations  or GEOS 131 - Geoscience Explorations  may NOT receive credit for CHEM 131 . 3 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 , or higher; and must qualify for MATT 107  or MATH 022 , or higher.
  
  •  

    CHEM 202 - Scientific and Decorative Glass Working


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    Fundamentals of working with glass tubing and rods. Techniques of end seals and tee tubes used to introduce the “feel” of handling glass; shaping glass tubing and crocheting glass rods. Proficiency required in end seals, tee tubes u-bends, flairs, and ring seals. A scientific project, an art project, and a project of the students’ choice are required. 2 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    CHEM 204 - Elementary Quantitative Analysis


    4 hrs (Sem I)
    Gravimetric and volumetric methods of analysis and stoichiometric relationships. Lecture, lab and problems. 2 lecture hours, 6 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHEM 106  and CHEM 106L .
  
  •  

    CHEM 208 - Chemical Engineering Calculations


    4 hrs (Sem II)
    Introduction to engineering calculations, material and energy balances including use of chemical equations; yield of a chemical process; handling of multiple, bypass, and recycle streams; and introduction to first law of thermodynamics as it applies to each problem. 4 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in PHYS 205  and MATH 118  or higher; and a grade of C or better or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 106  and CHEM 106L .
  
  •  

    CHEM 215 - Organic Chemistry I


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    A survey of the functional groups of organic compounds and their simple derivatives in terms of nomenclature, structure, bonding, syntheses, reactions, and stereochemistry. Physical and chemical properties are examined for each functional group and related to the structure. Students examine reactivity orders, orientation effects, and reaction rates. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHEM 106  and CHEM 106L . Corequisite(s): CHEM 215L .
  
  •  

    CHEM 215L - Organic Chemistry Laboratory I


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    This laboratory course focuses on the fundamental techniques of organic chemistry. Students learn the techniques of distillation, extraction, recrystallization, and chromatography. They apply instrumentation techniques including Infrared Spectroscopy (IR), Gas Chromatography (GC), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to determine the structure of unknown compounds. Students make predictions using a molecular modeling program. Students improve their science writing skills and make an oral presentation to their peers. 6 laboratory hours.

    Speaking Intensive Course

    Corequisite(s): CHEM 215 .
  
  •  

    CHEM 216 - Organic Chemistry II


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course lays the groundwork for more complex topics by teaching students how to think about chemical mechanisms, introducing the concepts of electrophilicity, nucleophilicity, addition reactions, and substitution reactions. It introduces classic methods for carbon-carbon bond formation, including the use of enolates and rearrangement reactions. Students learn to predict the relative reactivity of functional groups and are introduced to the concepts of thermodynamic and kinetic control. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHEM 215  and CHEM 215L .
  
  •  

    CHEM 216L - Organic Chemistry Laboratory II


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    A continuation of CHEM 215L . Many of the experiments are multi-step preparations with a greater emphasis on discovery style and experiments that require a team approach. Laboratory reporting includes formal reports similar to the preparation for journal publication and an oral report in a form suitable for professional meeting presentation. 6 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): CHEM 216 .
  
  •  

    CHEM 221 - Science of Crime Analysis


    4 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course is designed to provide an introduction to the science involved in crime scene analysis used in a modern forensic laboratory and the underlying scientific principles behind crime scene analysis.  Techniques used in various scientific disciplines and sub-disciplines will be showcased (geology/mineralogy, biology/pathology/entomology/palynology, chemistry/toxicology, physics, etc..).  Students will analyze data and identify or match unknowns using microscopes, chemical reactions, and various spectroscopies. This course is a UCC course. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

  
  •  

    CHEM 240 - Leadership in Chemistry Education


    2 hrs (Sem l, II)
    In this course, students are trained in group dynamics incorporating learning theory, learning styles, and collaborative learning principles. The CHEM 103  chemistry professor leads weekly meetings of the Peer Leaders in which examples relating to course content and facilitation strategies are addressed. The Peer Leaders are expected to function as “discussion facilitators” and lead their students to work with each other to construct their own answers to the problems. 1 lecture hour, 2 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and a previous chemistry equivalent to the PLTL chemistry course the student will lead.
  
  •  

    CHEM 315 - Organic Chemistry I


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    A survey of the functional groups of organic compounds and their simple derivatives in terms of nomenclature, structure, bonding, syntheses, reactions, and stereochemistry. Physical and chemical properties are examined for each functional group and related to the structure. Students examine reactivity orders, orientation effects, and reaction rates. Students submit a paper using a formal argument to correlate molecular structure to observed properties of reaction type. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHEM 106  and CHEM 106L . Corequisite(s): CHEM 315L .
  
  •  

    CHEM 315L - Organic Chemistry Laboratory I


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    This laboratory course focuses on the fundamental techniques of organic chemistry. Students learn the techniques of distillation, extraction, recrystallization, and chromatography. They apply instrumentation techniques including Infrared Spectroscopy (IR), Gas Chromatography (GC), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to determine the structure of unknown compounds. There is an emphasis on instrument calibration. Students make predictions using a molecular modeling program. Students improve their science writing skills and make an oral presentation to their peers. 6 laboratory hours.

    Writing and Speaking Intensive Course

    Corequisite(s): CHEM 315 .
  
  •  

    CHEM 316 - Organic Chemistry II


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course lays the groundwork for more complex topics by teaching students how to think about chemical mechanisms, introducing the concepts of electrophilicity, nucleophilicity, addition reactions, and substitution reactions. It introduces classic methods for carbon-carbon bond formation, including the use of enolates and rearrangement reactions. Students learn to predict the relative reactivity of functional groups and are introduced to the concepts of thermodynamic and kinetic control. Students submit a paper using a formal argument to correlate molecular structure to observed properties of reaction type. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHEM 315  and CHEM 315L .
  
  •  

    CHEM 316L - Organic Chemistry Laboratory II


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    A continuation of CHEM 315L . Many of the experiments are multi-step preparations with a greater emphasis on discovery style and experiments that require a team approach. Instrumentation techniques learned in CHEM 315L  will be applied. Laboratory reporting includes formal reports similar to the preparation for journal publication and an oral report in a form suitable for professional meeting presentation. 6 laboratory hours.

    Writing and Speaking Intensive Course

    Corequisite(s): CHEM 316 .
  
  •  

    CHEM 325 - Introductory Physical Chemistry


    4 hrs (Sem I)
    Course examines the fundamental gas laws, thermodynamics including equilibrium, chemical kinetics and catalysis, fundamental quantum mechanics including particle physics, wave functions, spectroscopy and bonding. Laboratory experiments, calorimetry, equilibrium, kinetics, spectroscopy, and the determination of various chemical and physical constants. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHEM 106  and PHYS 206 ; and a grade of C or better in MATH 118  or higher.
  
  •  

    CHEM 326 - Biochemistry


    4 hrs (Sem II)
    This course is a study of the function and structure of biological molecules including proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. Other topics include bioenergetics, membranes, hemoglobin, muscles, informational metabolism and intermediate metabolism of carbohydrates and lipid metabolism. Electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation are also studied. Offered in alternate (even-numbered) years. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in CHEM 215  and CHEM 215L ; or a grade of C or better in CHEM 315  and CHEM 315L .

Technical Chemistry

  
  •  

    CHMT 100 - Fuels, Lubricants and Coolants


    4 hrs (Sem I)
    Source, refining and design of petroleum products; artificial or man-made oils, lubricants, and coolants. 3 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.


Chinese (Mandarin)

  
  •  

    CHIN 100 - Basic Conversational Chinese (Mandarin)


    2 hrs (Offered on Demand)
    This course provides an introduction to basic vocabulary, language structures, and cultural information needed for spoken communication while traveling in China and/or interacting with Mandarin-speaking people.  Emphasis is on practical oral skills and culture.  Intended for students with no previous Chinese training and/or experience. 2 class hours.


Collision Repair and Refinishing

  
  •  

    BODY 100 - Non-Structural Analysis and Damage Repair


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Instruction presents an overview of safety and personal protective equipment, materials, measuring, welding, and information resources applicable to collision repair.  Students will investigate steel and aluminum dent repair along with various types of plastic body fillers.  SMC, fiberglass, and plastic body panel repair will also be explored.  Substrate preparation including sanding, two-part epoxy, shrinking, and primers/sealers will be discussed. 3 lecture hours.

    Corequisite(s): BODY 100L .
  
  •  

    BODY 100L - Non-Structural Analysis and Damage Repair Laboratory


    4 hrs (Sem I)
    Students will perform dent repair using hammer/dolly, stud gun, and heat shrinking techniques. Surface preparation using various plastic body fillers along with a variety of sanding techniques/tools will be stressed. Students will demonstrate bolt on panel removal, replacement, and alignment. Plastic panel identification and repair will also be explored. Spray gun usage/setup will be discussed as it applies to primer application. 12 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): BODY 100 .
  
  •  

    BODY 150 - Painting and Refinishing


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Instruction presents spraying/mixing techniques in various painting processes including: primers, sealers, acrylic enamels, urethane enamels, epoxy, base coat/clear coat, and water-borne products. Students will explore spray gun operation (conventional and HVLP), paint matching, blending, paint defects, and personal protective equipment related to paint application processes. 3 lecture hours.

    Corequisite(s): BODY 150L .
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11Forward 10 -> 17