Apr 20, 2021  
2019-2020 Vincennes University Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Vincennes University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM

The course numbering system is alpha-numeric, consisting of four letters and three numbers. The letters indicate the subject area of the course. Developmental courses have a zero as the initial digit. Freshman level courses carry numbers between 100 and 199. Sophomore courses are numbered 200 to 299. Junior and senior level courses carry numbers between 300 and 499.

Speaking and Writing Reading Intensive courses are indicated in the course description section of this catalog.

Listing for Special Instruction Courses. Vincennes University offers instruction tailored to the needs of special populations. The instruction is individualized to the particular needs of the business or industry, with emphasis that the content be college level. The following courses are established to permit flexibility within established credit hour designations.

 

History

  
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    HIST 240 - The History of Vietnam


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    The course will examine the historical cultural, social and political factors influencing events throughout the history of Vietnam. Topics will include the cultural background of Indochina, Vietnamese nationalism, French colonial policy, emergence of HoChi Minh, Vietnamese communist movement, U.S. involvement in Vietnam and Vietnam since unification. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    HIST 265 - History of the People of Japan


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    The course will focus on a survey of the History and Culture of the Japanese people from the Yamato Period approximately 500 AD to the present. Topics will include Early Japan, Chinese Rivalries, the Shogunate Period, the Meiji Restoration, the Russo-Japanese Wars, World War II, and Japan in the Modern World. 3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .

Health

  
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    HLTH 101 - Foundations of Health and Sports Medicine Professions


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Designed to increase students’ awareness and knowledge of health and sports medicine career opportunities, as well as the education and training required for these careers. Emphasis will also be placed upon fundamental health, sports medicine and related medical terminology, and technical information used as tools in the related career areas. The foundations and philosophy of these areas of professional preparation will also be emphasized. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    HLTH 111 - Apprenticeship First Aid I


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    This course covers basic first aid skills as required by the contracting industry. The American Red Cross First Aid Basics course is emphasized and represents the minimal guidelines for material coverage. 1 class hour.

    Prerequisite(s): For Associated Builders and Contractors Association Apprenticeship majors only.
  
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    HLTH 112 - Apprenticeship First Aid II


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    This course covers basic adult CPR skills as required by the contracting industry. The American Red Cross or American Heart Association CPR course will be emphasized and represents minimal guidelines for material coverage. 1 class hour.

    Prerequisite(s): For Associated Builders and Contractors Association Apprenticeship Students only.
  
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    HLTH 201 - Personal Health Science


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course acquaints students with basic personal health information and gives them a basis for self-direction of health behavior. The course provides physiological and psychological basis for health attitudes and practices including drugs, family health, and other critical issues. 3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in PFWL 100 ; and students must qualify for ENGL 010  or ENGL 079 .
  
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    HLTH 210 - Community Health and Wellness


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course is an introduction to community health needs, resources, services and programs at the local, state, national and international levels.  Analysis of problems, consideration of solutions, and promotion of programs of prevention and wellness will be covered. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in PFWL 100 ; and students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
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    HLTH 211 - First Aid


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course is designed to provide an introduction to basic first aid and emergency response procedures.  National standards for First Aid and CPR will be covered and represents the minimal course guidelines.  Students who qualify will receive certifications in adult, child, and infant CPR, AED, and First Aid Basics by one of the nationally accredited certifying agencies. This course is a transferIN course. 2 class hours.

  
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    HLTH 213 - Advanced First Aid


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Instruction in advanced first aid skills and cognitive knowledge are provided in this course. Professional Rescuer Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation skills are emphasized. Successful students will have the opportunity to become certified by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons in First Aid and Professional Rescuer CPR. 3 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in HLTH 211 .

Horticulture Technology

  
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    HORT 105 - Introduction to Landscape Horticulture


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    An introductory course in landscape horticulture. Emphasis will be on the study of growth and development, nomenclature, propagation, soils, and fertility related to trees, shrubs, flowers and turf. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    HORT 150 - Integrated Pest Management


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Identification of major insect, disease, and weed pests of ornamental shrubs, trees and turf in the Midwest. Students will study pesticide chemicals and application equipment for pest control and their effect on the environment. This class prepares students to take the CORE and 3a-Ornamental Pest exam through the Office of Indiana State Chemist. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

  
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    HORT 165 - Nursery and Garden Center Management


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    A study of the operation and management of capital and operating funds, plant materials, equipment, personnel and merchandising techniques required in nursery enterprises. 2 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

    Speaking Intensive Course

  
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    HORT 175 - Applied Related Training


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Eight weeks of practical experience with a nursery, garden center, greenhouse, golf course, or other closely related business during second half of spring semester. Time arranged. A minimum of 320 practicum hours is required.

  
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    HORT 205 - Landscaping I: Landscape Design


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Elementary principles of landscape drafting and elementary residential landscape planning. Emphasis on the selection of ornamental plants consistent with design and environmental requirements as well as presentation of the overall design. 2 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

  
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    HORT 225 - Introduction to Dendrology: Trees and Shrubs of the Midwest


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    The class will be a fundamental introduction to the native trees and shrubs of the Midwest.  Using the morphological characters of the trees of the area, students will learn key attributes to identify trees and shrubs.  Learning will be in an assortment of activities including campus and local wood hikes, specimen study and collection, and field trips to areas of distinction. 2 lecture, 2 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better or concurrent enrollment in BIOL 101 /BIOL 101L .
  
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    HORT 255 - Landscaping II: Landscape Management and Construction


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Correct landscape management practices of ornamental and woody landscape plants through pruning to maintain size, improve plant structure, and manage tree health, as well as understanding irrigation systems. Hands-on experience in installing, mulching, and maintaining trees and shrubs. Learn construction details on installing hardscapes. 2 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in HORT 205 .
  
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    HORT 270 - Arboriculture


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course focuses on the growth and care of shade trees, and the procedures and equipment involved in their maintenance. Existing industry standards as OSHA Safety, ANSI planting, pruning, fertilization, cabling, bracing, lightning protection will be covered. A computerized tree inventory will be made by each student. 2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours.

    Writing Reading Intensive Course


Hotel and Motel Management

  
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    HOTL 120 - Front Office Management


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    The principles required to organize, operate and manage a front office in a hotel or motel. Also included are night audit and financial considerations of the front office operations. Guest needs, salesmanship and procedures used in different types of operations are included. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    HOTL 135 - Introduction to Tourism Management


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course introduces the student to tourism management using a system approach that integrates a variety of hospitality and travel organizations and businesses.  It focuses on the understanding of tourism from the perspectives of travelers and destinations, while identifying tourism’s economic, socio-cultural, and environmental impacts on communities. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    HOTL 145 - Introduction to Events and the Meeting Planning Industry


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the meetings, expositions, events, and conventions industry (MEEC).  Topics will include the supply and demand side of MEEC management, the basic planning process needed for any event or meeting, sustainability, business ethics, and keeping pace with current industry trends.  Information provided from meeting planning professionals via video and/or guest lectures from event and meeting planners will reinforce the learning outcomes.  The class will provide students with the fundamentals of the MEEC industry.  Students will understand the necessary skills and abilities required to be a successful event professional, and the tasks and activities involved in producing a meeting or event. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    HOTL 150 - Housekeeping and Maintenance Management


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Management principles applicable to duties and responsibilities of housekeeping and maintenance departments. Housekeeping topics include room management, linen control, laundry facilities and scheduling. Maintenance topics include upkeep of hotel plant, sanitation, energy and conservation. Also discusses supervision of employees relative to these departments. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    HOTL 200 - Hotel and Restaurant Food Operations


    5 hrs (Sem I)
    This is a hands-on course in basic food preparation. Preparation and presentation of soups, sauces, vegetables, entrees and salads using a variety of cooking and preparation techniques will be covered. Professionalism in chef presentation and behaviors will be stressed. 7 class hours.

  
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    HOTL 210 - Hotel Conventions and Marketing


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    A course emphasizing organizing, arranging and operating conventions, trade shows and concessions. Sales and marketing departments and their functions will be covered. Identification of the convention market and application of proper sales and marketing management techniques are included. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    HOTL 230 - Hospitality Budgeting, Forecasting, and Cost Controls


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    A course devoted to the financial considerations of the hotel/restaurant operation. A study of profit and loss, financial statements, revenue and cost analysis, audits, and basic hotel/restaurant accounting will be included. Uniform system of accounts, budgeting and forecasting of costs and revenues, and cost controls will be covered. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    HOTL 240 - Hospitality Security


    1 hr (Sem II)
    This course is designed to make the student aware of the necessity of security in the revenue producing as well as the non-revenue producing areas of the hotel and restaurant. An emphasis will be placed on the security and safety of guests and their possessions. Other topics will include parking, swimming pools, recreation areas, and other public areas. 1 lecture hour.

  
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    HOTL 241 - Hospitality Customer Services


    1 hr (Sem II)
    This course is designed to help students understand the importance of the interaction between hospitality employees and guests. Quality service standards, service audit systems, and customer/employee feedback systems will be discussed. 1 lecture hour.

  
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    HOTL 242 - Dining Room Management


    1 hr (Sem II)
    This course is designed to provide food service management students a thorough knowledge of table service, dining room set-up, server stations, and wait-staff equipment. The qualities of a professional server and the creation of successful mise en place will be discussed. 1 lecture hour.


Health Sciences, General

  
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    HSGN 102 - Introduction to Health Careers


    2 hrs (Sem I)
    An introduction to assist students in selecting a career in health sciences. The course meets one evening per week for the semester. It consists of information on each of the health science careers offered at VU (Funeral Service Education, Health Information Management, both Associate Degree and Practical Nursing, Physical Therapist Assistant, Radiography, and Surgical Technology), as well as an overview of other health related careers. Content includes information regarding programs, laboratory experience, background and requirements for the curriculum, and employment opportunities in each career. Other aspects of the coursework include Universal Precautions, bioethical aspects of health care, professional responsibilities, and confidentiality issues. 2 lecture hours.

  
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    HSGN 120 - Certified Nursing Assistant


    4 hrs (Offered on Demand)
    This course will provide the student with an understanding of the role of the certified nursing assistant and health care delivery through resident care procedures. The course provides all the necessary information from the Indiana State Department of Health Core Curriculum for Certified Nursing Assistants. At the end of the course students will be eligible to take the Certified Nursing Assistant exam for the state of Indiana to become state certified. 40 lecture hours, 75 clinical laboratory hours.

  
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    HSGN 140 - Pharmacology for Allied Health Professions


    2 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will explore general pharmacologic concepts for allied health professions, including physical therapist assistant and athletic training students who have no background in pharmacology. The therapeutic effects, side effects, and clinical applications relating to rehabilitation will be discussed for drugs affecting major systems of the body.  This course will explore general pharmacologic concepts for allied health professions, including physical therapist assistant and athletic training students who have no background in pharmacology. The therapeutic effects, side effects, and clinical applications relating to rehabilitation will be discussed for drugs affecting major systems of the body.  2 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 ; and must qualify for MATH 016  or MATH 022 .
  
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    HSGN 240 - Multicultural Health


    3 hrs (Sem I, II, Summer)
    This course will explore what it means to deliver culturally competent healthcare in the U.S. Students will examine multicultural beliefs about health and illness, the impact of race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on healthcare outcomes, and methods to improve the delivery of culturally sensitive care to a diverse population. Students will explore their own cultural backgrounds and how these may impact healthcare delivery. In addition, the course will study health concerns of specific cultural and ethnic groups in the United States and health promotion strategies for reducing or eliminating health disparities. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ENGL 101 .
  
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    HSGN 311 - Biomedical and Managerial Statistics


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    As a course specifically designed for health care management students as well as interested students in the health sciences, this course will address the basic managerial and biostatistical concepts of interest to those involved in health services delivery. Topics will include vital statistics and selected public health measures, as well as selected descriptive and inferential statistical applications specific to the management of health care services. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in any 100 level or higher MATH course.

Homeland Security and Public Safety

  
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    HSPS 222 - Hazardous Materials and Basic Emergency Response


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course establishes fundamental knowledge and basic skills in the area of hazardous materials awareness and operations, incident management, and basic technical rescue. Attention will be placed on physicals skills with HAZMAT equipment and implementation of that equipment. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    HSPS 310 - Homeland Security


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    The purpose of this course in homeland security is to explore the boundaries of this 21st century national security mission by examining the threats, the actors, and the organizational structures and resources required to defend the American homeland. It will also focus on U.S. policies and programs to address the hazard posed by international and domestic terrorism. It will challenge the students to engage in a comprehensive analysis of what some have called the most important national security mission in the 21st century. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    HSPS 321 - Homeland Security Law


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will examine an array of legal topics that face the United States government in dealing with terrorism and other security risks while keeping a careful balance between national security and civil liberties. Legal and constitutional principles and their application in homeland security and national security will be covered. Case law, statutes, and presidential directives that form the foundation of homeland security law will be discussed. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    HSPS 340 - Junior Homeland Security Seminar


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This seminar will be a student driven analysis of risks from, and responses to, all hazards in regard to protection of life, property, cultural assets, and critical infrastructure. Based on current events, students will work separately and as teams to analyze the vulnerabilities, consequences, and responses regarding various threats and will critique and postulate policies and procedures to prevent, mitigate, respond, and recover from these threats. Tabletop exercises and field training exercises will also be conducted. 3 seminar hours.

  
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    HSPS 350 - Technology in Homeland Security


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will provide Homeland Security students a fundamental understanding of current and emergent technologies within the Homeland Security Enterprise. Students will examine applications of technologies to help prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from threats and hazards impacting national security. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    HSPS 360 - Weapons of Mass Destruction


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons offer both terrorists and rogue states a powerful selection of tools to swing the correlation of forces in their direction. Understanding range and characteristics of these weapons, how they are most effectively employed,and potential impacts are critical to defending communities against them. Provides a detailed look at history, capabilities, and tactics and explores options available to both attacker and defender. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    HSPS 370 - Intelligence and Homeland Security


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will examine our nation’s intelligence-driven, threat-focused approach to defending the country from a range of national security and major crime threats.   The role and mission of the Federal agencies within the intelligence community, the intelligence cycle, counterintelligence and counterterrorism will all be discussed.  3 lecture hours.

  
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    HSPS 380 - Critical Infrastructure and Key Asset Protection


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will examine and explore our nation’s comprehensive and complex private and public sector critical infrastructures and the vulnerabilities that could be exposed within our nation’s critical infrastructures and the concomitant threats to our society.  The course will provide students with an overview of how our nation’s public and private sector leaders and stakeholders work to protect our nation’s most essential and valuable assets by identifying potential threats, mitigating those threats and minimizing the consequences of CI/KR failures caused by the impact of human, natural or technological events.  Students will become familiar with the pertinent aspects of our nation’s Critical Infrastructure Protection Plan and the supporting Sector Specific Plans within each of the 16 critical infrastructure sectors.  3 lecture hours.

  
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    HSPS 390 - Ethics for the Homeland Security and Public Safety Professional


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    The course will include an in-depth examination of individual core values and principles which promote fair and impartial conduct and behavior and the protection of human and civil rights.  The course will focus on such topics as basic ethics and standards of conduct, the causes and prevention of corruption, moral decision making, conflicts of interest, alcohol and substance misuse and abuse, and compliance with state and federal law.  Practical scenarios will be used to assess the students’ understanding and application of the ethical principles and behavior discussed in class.  3 lecture hours.

  
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    HSPS 410 - Research Methods


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    The objective of this course is to provide a foundation for the student to conduct successful applied research within the framework of the Homeland Security and Public Safety environment. The primary areas covered will be scientific methods of research design, principles of data collection, interpretation of research data and ethical concerns (avoidance of bias and prejudice) in survey battery instruments or procedures. Students will be required to develop a research project and present it to the class. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in MATH 110  or MGMT 265 .
  
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    HSPS 415 - Introduction to Terrorism


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    The course identifies the fundamental and underlying reasons why America is a target for terrorists as it compares and contrasts various domestic and international terrorist groups and their respective ideologies. In exploring these ideologies, the course will examine the historical basis for terrorist acts, the psychological, cultural, and sociological underpinnings of the goals and apparent motivations of the modern terrorist, the usability and validity of “profiles” of the typical terrorist, and the differences between the modern “active” terrorist organizations. In addition, the course will define the various government agencies that are involved in the War on Terrorism. 3 class hours.

  
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    HSPS 420 - Crisis and Disaster Issues in Homeland Security and Public Safety


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Examination of specific public crises in order to prepare, respond to, and recover from them. Case analysis will be used to develop leadership and decision-making skills needed when a crisis occurs, whether the crisis is natural or the result of specific acts against a community, state, or the nation. Additional issues such as organizational structure and response training of personnel will be studied. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of critical thinking skills needed in an ever-changing world. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    HSPS 470 - Internship in Public Safety


    3 hrs (Sem I, II, Summer)
    The internship will provide students with opportunities to learn from significant work or volunteer experiences in diverse public safety areas. The internship will focus on performing management or staff duties appropriate to the operation of the organizations served. A minimum of 200 practicum hours is required.

  
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    HSPS 472 - Internship in Cyber Security


    3 hrs (Sem I, II, Summer)
    The internship will provide students with opportunities to learn from significant work in cyber security. The internship will focus on performing information and security assurance activities. A minimum of 200 practicum hours is required.

  
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    HSPS 490 - Capstone Experience, Homeland Security and Public Safety


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    A course intended to synthesize and integrate the knowledge and skills of the major course work and the general and liberal education course work. Students will be required to complete a major research project aimed at addressing a philosophic, social, political, economic, or historical problem connected to homeland security and public safety. Activities in the course will include a major research paper and an oral presentation based on significant research and project results. These activities will be opportunities for students to display the content knowledge, research skills, critical thinking, affective learning, and presentation skills needed to be life-long learners. 3 lecture hours.


Honors Humanities/Science/Social Science

  
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    HONR 201 - Honors Seminar: Humanities


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This seminar will introduce honors students to the ways of knowing, diverse learning styles, campus resources, and off-campus learning activities appropriate for a member of the honors program.  Additional themes and emphases may vary, but students will study past civilizations and key historic events in order to analyze the individual’s place within contemporary American society. This course is restricted to students accepted into the Honors Program. 3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

  
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    HONR 202 - Honors Seminar: Social Science


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This seminar will introduce honors students to the ways of knowing, diverse learning styles, campus resources, and off-campus learning activities appropriate for a member of the honors program.  Additional themes and emphases may vary, but students will study past civilizations and persistent social tensions and issues in order to analyze the individual’s place within contemporary American society. This course is restricted to students accepted into the Honors Program.  3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

  
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    HONR 203 - Honors Seminar: Science


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This seminar will introduce honors students to the Ways of Knowing, diverse learning styles, campus resources, and off-campus learning activities appropriate for a member of the honors program.  Additional themes and emphases may vary, but students will study past civilizations and key scientific breakthroughs and events in order to analyze the individual’s place within contemporary American society. This course is restricted to students accepted into the Honors Program. 3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course


Humanities

  
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    HUMN 102 - Exploring the Humanities


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course is designed to enhance students’ academic and social integration into college, helping them transition from high school into the university community.  Students will read a variety of literature focused upon academic success, information literacy, and experiential learning with a focus on achieving success in college and in life.  Course themes may vary but will focus on campus resources, learning preferences, self-motivation, and management. Students will read a variety of literature centered upon education and will be introduced to critical thinking skills. 2 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): SAT Writing and Reading score of 370 or below, or equivalent placement scores.
  
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    HUMN 200 - Humanities


    3 hrs (Arranged)
    Concentrated study of a special project to acquaint students with the place of humanities within the cultural milieu. Usually the project will involve field study and follow-up activities. Enrollment by permission of the Humanities/Social Science Division Dean. 3 class hours.

  
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    HUMN 210 - Introduction to Humanities I


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    A general education course designed to acquaint students with the broad and interrelated disciplines with the humanities. The content includes painting, sculpture, architecture, and drama. 3 class hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ENGL 101 .
  
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    HUMN 211 - Introduction to Humanities II


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    A general education course designed to acquaint students with the broad and interrelated disciplines within humanities. The content includes dance, literature, music, and film. 3 class hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ENGL 101 . HUMN 210  is not a prerequisite for HUMN 211.
  
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    HUMN 245 - Cultural Diversity: Humanities


    3 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Utilizing a multi-disciplinary approach, this course will provide students with an opportunity to explore their own ethnic roots. In addition, it will increase their understanding of the main ethnic groups in the United States: Appalachians, Native Americans, Afro-Americans, Asian-Americans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics. The social and religious impact on the cultural integration of these groups will be introduced. Discussions on how these aspects of United States culture may affect international dialogues will also be included. HUMN 245  and SOCL 245 - Cultural Diversity: Sociology  are equivalent courses; therefore, students with credit in HUMN 245  will NOT receive additional credit in SOCL 245 . 3 class hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in ENGL 101 .

Insurance

  
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    INSR 210 - Principles of Insurance


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Survey of important methods of handling personal risks for business and individuals. An analysis of life insurance, casualty, health, pension plans and social insurance. Problems of underwriting, rate computation, and programming. 3 lecture hours.


Journalism

  
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    JOUR 102 - Print Advertising Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    In this laboratory course, students become staff members of The Trailblazer, the University’s weekly student newspaper, and, as such, apply the basic principles and techniques of selling, layout, and production of advertising for publication. Students will use the multi-unit desktop computer publishing system extensively. 10 laboratory hours.

  
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    JOUR 110 - News Reporting


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    An introduction to reporting and news and feature story writing through the study of the elements of news, newsgathering, news story structures, reporting techniques and problems, and the fundamentals of news writing. 3 class hours.

  
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    JOUR 111 - News Reporting Laboratory


    1 hr (Sem I, II)
    Students become staff members of The Trailblazer, the University’s student newspaper. In the news reporting laboratory, they apply the principles and techniques of reporting and writing news for publication (both print and online). Students may earn up to three hours credit for this course, but may enroll for no more than one credit hour per semester. 6 laboratory hours.

  
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    JOUR 212 - Editing


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course provides instruction in journalistic editing. Key content areas include headline-writing, page layout and design; copyediting; proofreading; and fact-checking. The lab portion of the course allows students to use these skills in production of the student newspaper. 3 lecture hours, 6 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in JOUR 110 .
  
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    JOUR 213 - Communications Law


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course examines the principles of civil and criminal libel, including detailed attention to recent U.S. Supreme Court pronouncements on the latitude of the press in reporting and commenting. Also treated are privilege and contempt, fair comment and criticism, public meetings and public records, “shield laws,” and the right of privacy. 3 class hours.

  
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    JOUR 214 - Advanced Journalism Laboratory I


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    Students in JOUR 214 resume their roles as staff members of The Trailblazer and are engaged in intensive experiences in reporting and writing news, the feature and human-interest story, and the interpretative/investigative story; in all aspects of copyreading (editing), and in formulating and writing editorials (opinion pieces) and columns. Opportunities in newspaper news-editorial production and personnel management are abundant. The laboratory is equipped with a multi-unit desktop computer publishing system. 20 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in JOUR 111 .
  
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    JOUR 216 - Mass Communications


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    An introduction to the media of mass communication – the roles, characteristics, interactions, and significant and timely problems of newspapers, radio, television, magazines, and films. Lectures also deal with basic theories of communication and mass communication, the major developments in the evolution of the mass media, and the nature of press freedom and its condition in different areas of the world. This course is a transferIN course. 3 class hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
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    JOUR 217 - Advanced Journalism Laboratory II


    2 hrs (Sem I, II)
    This course is a continuation of JOUR 214 . 20 laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in JOUR 111  and JOUR 214 .

Japanese

  
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    JPNS 104 - Basic Conversational Japanese


    2 hrs (Offered on Demand)
    This course will provide an introduction to spoken Japanese and cultural information, focusing on the traveler’s needs. Students will participate in group practice, directed dialogues, and role playing. 2 class hours.

  
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    JPNS 105 - Japanese Level I


    4 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will provide an introduction to the Japanese language and culture with emphasis on listening and speaking skills. Emphasis will be placed on guided communication tasks, vocabulary building, introduction to writing, using audio-visual aids, video, and language lab. 4 class hours.

  
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    JPNS 106 - Japanese Level II


    4 hrs (Sem II)
    This course is a continuation of JPNS 105  with structured oral communication and vocabulary building. Continued emphasis will be placed on listening and speaking skills, including reading of graded and glossed materials, basic grammatical structures, and introductory writing. 4 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in JPNS 105  or appropriate placement test score.
  
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    JPNS 117 - Explore Japan: Life, Culture, and History in Japan


    3 hrs (Offered on Demand in the Summer)
    This two week study tour of Japan involves the following components: mandatory pre-departure orientation sessions, participation in planning self-directed tour days as a component of the study tour, home stays with families in Japan, visits of cultural and educational sites in Japan, post-trip research paper on Japanese culture, and post-trip presentation on VU’s campus about travel experience. 3 class hours.

  
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    JPNS 205 - Japanese Level III


    4 hrs (Sem I)
    Emphasis on reading. Conversation coordinated with reading of cultural text, written and oral reports. Continued study of grammar structures and vocabulary building. 4 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in JPNS 106  or appropriate placement test score.
  
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    JPNS 206 - Japanese Level IV


    4 hrs (Sem II)
    A continuation of JPNS 205  with emphasis on writing. Cultural and contemporary topics. 4 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in JPNS 205 .
  
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    JPNS 213 - Intermediate Japanese Readings I


    4 hrs (Offered on Demand)
    This course will focus on readings of news and cultural articles, as well as literary works, including haiku, other short poems, manga, and short stories, all especially prepared with controlled vocabulary and structures and appropriate cultural and historical notes for intermediate students.  Students will discuss and write in both English and Japanese about the articles and works read.   4 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in JPNS 206 .
  
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    JPNS 214 - Intermediate Japanese Readings II


    3 hrs (Offered on Demand)
    This course will focus on readings of news and cultural articles, as well as literary works, including haiku, other short poems, manga, and short stories, different from those in JPNS 213  and with less controlled and more authentic vocabulary and structures. Students will discuss and write in both English and Japanese about the articles and works read.  3 class hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in JPNS 206  and JPNS 213 .
  
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    JPNS 215 - Japanese Popular Culture and Society


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Taught in English, this course examines contemporary Japanese popular culture from artistic, literary, and social-theoretical perspectives. Recent cultural productions in film, anime, music, art, literature, fashion, and digital media as related to distinctive Japanese traditions will be discussed. No prior knowledge of the Japanese language is required.  3 class hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 

Law Enforcement, Conservation

  
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    LAWC 101 - Conservation Enforcement I


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    The purpose of this course is to present an overview of day-to-day experience in the field of conservation enforcement as it pertains to the officer delegated this responsibility. How this particular law enforcement discipline integrates with the criminal justice system will be studied. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    LAWC 155 - Wildlife Criminal Investigations


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    The purpose of this course of instruction is to present an overview of the fundamentals of investigative techniques that are unique to fish and wildlife crimes. Students participate in a number of practical field exercises during the course of the semester. These practical field exercises mirror those that are commonly experienced by conservation law enforcement officers on a daily basis. By analyzing and completing these ‘real life’ field scenarios, the student will learn to collect, analyze, and apply all sources of information available to them as investigators of fish/wildlife crime, in order to successfully draw logical conclusions and achieve successful prosecutions. In addition, the student will be able to demonstrate an ability to interpret fish/wildlife laws, rules, and regulations, and apply these laws to actual field situations. Students will learn to perform a number of daily tasks required of conservation law enforcement officers, including preliminary field inquiries, information gathering, wildlife crime scene processing, interviewing, ticket writing, and report writing. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    LAWC 160 - Introduction to North American Wildlife


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    In this course, students will focus on a general overview of North American Wildlife.  Special attention will be paid to large and small mammals, upland game birds, and waterfowl in the Midwest. There will be emphasis placed on nonindigenous species’ influence on native wildlife and habitat. This course will be directed towards the needs of the field conservation law enforcement officer. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    LAWC 210 - Marine Enforcement and Response


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will explore the marine duties of a conservation officer. It will enable the student to handle basic boat crewman skills and learn the terminology related to the marine environment. This course will also focus on boating law, providing the future conservation officer with knowledge required to professionally enforce those laws. This course will also examine the conservation officer’s role with port security and protection of water-based infrastructures such as locks and dams. The material covered will be relevant to FEMA certified topics. 3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

  
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    LAWC 250 - Conservation Enforcement II


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course deals with the specific day-to-day problems of enforcement of conservation laws. Thought will be given to the judicial process as it pertains to the conservation law violator. Arrests, search and seizures, as well as case preparation will be discussed and reviewed. Specific problems of field enforcement and encounters will be studied and discussed. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
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    LAWC 255 - Wildlife Management


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Orientation will be directed toward the conservation officer’s understanding of wildlife management principles. The course direction will include animal habitat management, life history information and techniques necessary to maintain, deter, or enhance population of game or non-game species. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in LAWC 160  and BIOL 101 /101L  .
  
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    LAWC 270 - Conservation Law Enforcement Citizens Academy


    3 hrs (Summer)
    Fifteen interested and qualified students will have the opportunity to attend a Citizens Academy directed by the Indiana Conservation Officers here on the Vincennes Campus. Topics will pertain to river rescue, waterfowl enforcement, vehicle operations, firearms, defensive tactics, Hunter/Trapper and Boaters Education Programs. This Citizens Academy will serve as an internship and will be available in the summer only.  Minimum of 52.5 practicum hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 2.5 cumulative GPA; a law enforcement or conservation law enforcement major; and completion of 30 credit hours.

Law Enforcement

  
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    LAWE 100 - Survey of Criminal Justice


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will study the history, role, development, philosophy, and Constitutional aspects of the United States criminal justice system. The course will explore the interrelationship, functions, and responsibilities of law enforcement, the courts, and correctional system. This course is a transferIN course. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    LAWE 101 - Basic Police Operations


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will introduce the students to the basic functions of a police officer in society. The students will be guided to understand officer initiated activity, directed patrol responsibilities, standard report writing of incidents, and standards of proof.  Students will deploy their knowledge through scenarios gaining an understanding of how case law governs an officer’s actions. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    LAWE 145 - Ethics and Professionalism in Criminal Justice


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course will guide students to understand the culture within the criminal justice system in order to prepare them for their chosen profession. This will be accomplished through critical writing exercises, communication exercises, core values training, community service, stress inoculation, and scenario based learning. Students will participate in physical exercises or other pertinent projects if medical or physical limitations prevent their participation in physical exercises.  3 lecture hours.

  
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    LAWE 150 - Criminal Minds and Deviant Behavior


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    An introduction to the phenomena of crime and delinquency, crime typology, and victimology, as well as the role of law enforcement in the prevention and control of deviant behavior. This course will examine the theoretical perspectives in criminology. Through classroom activities, students will be exposed to profiling techniques and gain experience in identifying motivating factors of criminal behavior.  3 lecture hours.

  
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    LAWE 155 - Substantive Criminal Law


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will study the legislative power of government and the development of criminal law with consideration given to Constitutional limitations. Types of crime will be explored with emphasis on definitions of crimes in the United States and application through interpretation of criminal law. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    LAWE 160 - Criminal Investigation


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    Fundamentals of criminal investigation, theory and history; crime scene to courtroom with emphasis on techniques appropriate to specific crimes. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    LAWE 201 - Current Trends, Issues, and Topics in Law Enforcement


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course will focus on current trends, issues, and topics in the field of Law Enforcement that are touched on in some courses, but are worthy of extensive examination. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    LAWE 202 - Advanced Police Operations


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course presents methods a professional within the criminal justice field uses to protect themselves, the public, and apprehend criminals. The course will evaluate the procedures and techniques officers use through the lens of maintaining public support and human relationships. This course will expand upon essential training tasks all police officers are required to have in order to maintain their certifications. Topics will include mental health awareness, active shooters, strategies, and tactics of patrol stops, and an in-depth review of officer use of force. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in LAWE 101 .
  
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    LAWE 205 - Procedural Criminal Law


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Study will be made of the constitutional framework controlling governmental practices and procedures as they operate upon the citizen. Consideration will be given to consequences of governmental overreaching. Procedures for arrest, search and seizure, warrants, interrogation, stop and frisk, and identifications will be examined.  3 lecture hours.

    Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better or concurrent enrollment in COMM 143  or COMM 148 .
  
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    LAWE 210 - Police Operations and Community Relations


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    Administration of police line and support operations, including patrol as basic operation of police function, investigation of delinquent and criminal offenders, traffic control, intelligence and other special operational units. Manpower distribution, analysis of operations, enforcement policy, operations during civil disorders and disasters. The role of the police officer in achieving and maintaining public support, human relations, public information, relationship with violators and complainants. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    LAWE 215 - Police Administration and Organization


    3 hrs (Sem I, II, Summer)
    Introduction to the basic principles of law enforcement administration and organizational structure, their functions and activities, records, communications, public relations, personnel and training, policy formation, planning, research, inspection, and control. Principles of command and supervision in personnel management of police organizations, evaluation and promotion, discipline training, employee welfare, problem solving, and leadership. This course is offered online only. 3 lecture hours.

  
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    LAWE 225 - Introduction to Forensic Science


    3 hrs (Sem I, II, Summer)
    This course is an overview of the following aspects and theories of criminalistics as related to the crime scene and its investigation. Included will be laboratory procedures and capabilities; crime scene searching and sketching; photography; firearms and toolmark identification; fingerprints; shoe and tire impressions; headlamp examination; arson; microanalysis of trace evidence such as glass, hairs, fibers, paint, and explosives; drugs and toxicological analysis; serology; instrumentation; document examination; preservation of evidence; and the importance of forensic science in the courtroom. The course will emphasize the newest techniques and equipment available. This course is offered online only. 3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): Open only to Distance Education students enrolled in the Law Enforcement Studies Concentration.
  
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    LAWE 250 - Juvenile Delinquency


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course provides an introduction to the structure and operation of the juvenile justice system in the United States. Responsibilities of the juvenile police officer, juvenile court, child protective service worker, and juvenile probation officer will be examined. Emphasis is placed on the types and causes of juvenile delinquency, while using practical application to understand the goal of the juvenile system in the United States.  3 lecture hours.

    Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101  or higher.
  
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    LAWE 260 - Crime Scene and Criminal Investigation


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the basic aspects of crime scene processing and the subsequent investigation. By utilizing lecture and practical exercises, students will learn evidence identification, processing and preservation skills. Additionally, they will understand the procedures of conducting interviews, interrogations and courtroom etiquette. 3 lecture/laboratory hours.

    Writing Reading Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
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    LAWE 270 - Internship in Law Enforcement


    3 hrs (Summer)
    Internship for interested and qualified law enforcement majors with a state or local law enforcement agency. Students will have an opportunity to work on interpersonal communication skills. This internship will also allow the students to make valuable contacts and network in specific areas of interest. This internship may be served on weekends during the semester or during the summer. Students will be required to serve a minimum of 150 practicum hours.

  
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    LAWE 275 - Practicum in Law Enforcement


    3 hrs (Sem I, II, Summer)
    Students in the Law Enforcement Studies Concentration will be required to observe a criminal justice agency or a combination of agencies (law enforcement, corrections, courts, etc.). Upon completion of the required hours, students will be required to write a paper related to their experiences or observations according to the guidelines established by the coordinator of the practicum. The practicum will be supervised by the Law Enforcement Department chair or designate. This course is offered online only. A minimum of 150 practicum hours is required.

  
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    LAWE 281 - Indiana Law Enforcement Certification


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course is intended for the student to obtain the required “Pre-Basic Certification” that is recognized by the Indiana Law Enforcement Training Board & Academy. Pre-Basic is a Law Enforcement introductory course required of all newly-hired personnel with law enforcement powers. Areas to be emphasized will be arrest procedures, search and seizure, jurisdiction, criminal law, traffic law, emergency vehicle operations, physical tactics (force continuum), firearms qualification, and lawful use of deadly force. Physical agility will also be required and evaluated by the exit and entrance standards set by the ILETB. 2 lecture hours.


Literature

  
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    LITR 100 - Introduction to Literature


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    An introduction to literature and to three major genres: fiction, poetry, and drama. Emphasis is placed on the ability to read critically and gain an appreciation for literature. This course is a transferIN course. 3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
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    LITR 210 - Literature of the Old Testament


    3 hrs (Sem I)
    This course is designed to emphasize the literary content of the Old Testament, the contribution it has made to human development, its historical setting, and to give insight into the sociological, ethical, and theological implications of the Old Testament’s writings. Offered in even-numbered years. 3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
  
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    LITR 211 - Literature of the New Testament


    3 hrs (Sem II)
    This course is designed to emphasize the writings of the New Testament so far as their literary structure is concerned and to show its impact on the social and ethical structure of the time along with the emergence of a new community in the world of that day. Offered in odd-numbered years. 3 lecture hours.

    Writing Reading and Speaking Intensive Course

    Prerequisite(s): Students must qualify for ENGL 101 .
 

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