Jul 21, 2019  
2011-12 Vincennes University Catalog 
    
2011-12 Vincennes University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

General Education


General Education Skills


General education is an integral component of the learning process at Vincennes University, one which allows our students to prepare in a well-rounded fashion for future careers and educational pursuits. The skills listed below are general education skills which have been identified by the faculty as the minimum expected of a student graduating from this institution. Some skills (marked with an asterisk*) will be measured by basic skills assessment instruments at the conclusion of a student’s program of study while others are to serve as guidelines for faculty and student as the student progresses through his/her program.

  1. Reading
    The student should:
    1. summarize material accurately and concisely;
    2. interpret subject matter literally and inferentially;*
    3. seek and acquire vocabulary through reading;*
    4. seek and understand subject matter pertinent to his/her career.
  2. Writing
    The student should:
    1. write a document showing a clear purpose, effective organization, adequate supporting details, and using a mechanically correct style;
    2. critically analyze and evaluate his/her own and others’ writing;*
    3. appropriately incorporate ideas from outside sources into his/her own words with proper credit given;
    4. be able to write a personal resume.
  3. Oral Communication Skills
    The student should:
    1. express himself/herself clearly, using appropriate speaking styles that suit the message, purpose, and context;
    2. use nonverbal cues which are appropriate to the verbal message;
    3. actively listen to and critically evaluate oral communication;
  4. Critical Thinking/Problem Solving
    The student should:
    1. use reasoning skills based on accuracy, clarity, solid evidence, depth and fairness;*
    2. define the problem;*
    3. analyze the problem for possible causes;*
    4. develop possible strategies for solutions;*
    5. select and implement strategies for solutions;*
    6. evaluate the effects of the strategy(ies) for solutions.
  5. Mathematics
    The student should:
    1. apply a combination of arithmetic and algebraic skills appropriate to his/her major;*
    2. apply geometric spatial skills appropriate to his/her major;*
    3. solve problems using the appropriate skills identified above in both rote exercises and novel situations appropriate to his/her major.
  6. Science Skills
    The student should:
    1. apply the use of observation and/or measurements to propose, analyze, test, and refine explanations for various physical or biological phenomena, appropriate to his/her major;
    2. express, in written or verbal mode, the level of knowledge and understanding of the current scientific explanations of the physical and/or biological phenomena, appropriate for his/her major;
    3. apply the proper use of English and metric systems of weights and measures.
  7. Computer Skills
    The student should:
    1. have the ability to start up and move into a word processing program, complete the mechanical requirements of good writing (i.e., margins, spacing, font sizes, tabbing, centering, headers), editing (including cutting and pasting), spell checking, and printing.
    2. have the ability to find, evaluate, and select Internet sources to incorporate in their writing. Students will also be able to document these properly.
    3. have the ability to save files to hard drives and disks, and they should be able to retrieve them.
  8. Health and Physical Education Skills
    The student should:
    1. demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the positive effects of physical activity and exercise upon the quality of individual health related fitness by:
      1. identifying the essential components of physical fitness and their specific positive effects upon individual health related fitness goals;
      2. identifying and applying safe principles of fitness conditioning for development of an effective personal exercise and physical activity program;
      3. demonstrating skills in assessing personal fitness levels and needs for the purpose of planning and initiating lifelong fitness activity;
    2. recognize positive lifestyle choices and take responsibility for his/her well-being in making decisions regarding nutrition, body composition, stress management, personal safety, drugs, alcohol, tobacco, consumer health care, and other areas of life which influence personal wellness;
    3. gain basic knowledge and skill in appreciation for a variety of exercise and physical activity skills useful in the pursuit of lifelong fitness.
  9. Library and Research Skills
    The student should:
    1. use the library as a source for lifelong learning, for leisure, personal, and professional needs;
    2. select and evaluate basic library reference tools and information sources, including professional journals which pertain to a student’s particular field of study, and understand appropriate techniques for recording and organizing needed information;
    3. use basic computerized systems for accessing library resources;
  10. Cultural and Historical Awareness
    To develop into a positive contributing member of society, the student should:
    1. express verbally and in writing the effects of historical and political forces on their chosen career;
    2. have knowledge of historical events, cultural diversity, geography, and various political and economic systems of the world;
    3. have increased self-awareness of the psychological and social forces which shape and contribute to their behavior;
    4. have an awareness of literature and the arts.
  11. Socialization
    The student should:
    1. respond to others in a polite, courteous manner;
    2. demonstrate respect for other people’s values;
    3. demonstrate responsible behavior by accepting accountability for his/her own actions;
    4. present a positive attitude about learning and studying by attending class and completing assignments;
    5. learn to balance extra-curricular activities with academic activities and efforts.

Definition of General Education


General Education at Vincennes University focuses on two distinct but interrelated educational components. Each component is essential to ensure development of measurable basic skills, critical and creative thinking skills, and a breadth of knowledge needed both to strengthen students’ work in their major and to achieve the levels of understanding expected of all college graduates. The first component of general education at V.U. is basic skills. The purpose of this study is to ensure that students read, write, speak, and compute at a college level. These skills are necessary, not only for the communication and computation crucial to a successful life after completion of a degree, but also for the active and successful participation in the pursuit of a degree. Basic skills will be enhanced as students progress through the remainder of their course work, and especially as they complete general education’s second component, liberal education. The purpose of this study is to actualize the students’ potential to live fuller lives as individuals and as members of different social institutions. This course work provides the opportunity for students to develop an appreciation of humanity’s varied responses to life lived in the natural world, both as an individual and as a part of society. As a consequence of this study, students should achieve a better understanding of the world and people around them, and should thus be able to live a fuller and more participatory life.

General Education Models


General Education Model for Associate Degrees effective 2011-12


Basic Skills Core


Reading:

  • Earn a C or above in at least one Reading Intensive course.
Writing: (3)

Mathematics: (3)

  • One 100-level or higher MATH or MATT course (A.A.S.)
  • One 100-level or higher MATH course (A.A., A.S.) 3 hrs
Oral Communication: (3)

One of the following as appropriate for the major:

Total Credit Hours for A.A.S. (9)

Total Credit Hours for A.A. and A.S. (9)

Skills Enhancement and Liberal Education Core


For A.A.

One of the following Writing Skills Courses: (3)

Computer Skills

  • See explanation of Computer Skills below.
Laboratory Science (3)

  • (chosen from the Common Core Liberal Education list) 3 hrs
Social Science (6)

Humanities (6)

  • (the first three hours chosen from the Common Core Liberal Education list, the second three hours chosen from the Broad Core Liberal Education list) 6 hrs
Foreign Language (8)

  • (Foreign Language directed toward the B.A. degree must include 8 hours of intermediate language in the same language) 8 hrs
Total Credit Hours for A.A. (28-29)

For A.S.

One of the following Writing Skills Courses: (3)

Computer Skills

  • See explanation of Computer Skills below.
Laboratory Science (3)

  • (chosen from the Common Core Liberal Education list) 3 hrs
Humanities (3)

  • (chosen from the Common Core Liberal Education list) 3 hrs
Social Science (6)

One of the following: (3)

  • Humanities, Science/Mathematics* (chosen from the Broad Core Liberal Education list) 3 hrs
Total Credit Hours for A.S. (20-21)

For A.A.S.

Computer Skills

  • See explanation of Computer Skills below.
Science (3)

  • (chosen from the Common Core Liberal Education list) 3 hrs
Social Science (3)

One course from two different Liberal Education Core lists: (6)

  • Humanities, Mathematics*, Science, Social Science or Writing 6 hrs
Total Credit Hours for A.A.S. (14-15)

Note

Courses for Humanities, Science and Mathematics, and Social Science in the General Education Program must be selected from courses listed in the approved Liberal Education list. These courses must be outside the major specialization courses to qualify as general education.

*The Basic Skills Core mathematics requirement may not be used for this credit.

Major Program


Specialization Courses

All other courses, as determined and prescribed by the program, which may include additional academic skills, communication, general education, occupational, technical, free electives or other program requirements.

General Education Model for Baccalaureate Degrees effective 2011-12


Basic Skills Core


Writing: (3)

Speaking: (3)

Mathematics: (3)

Total Credit Hours for B.A. and B.S. (9)

Skills Enhancement and Liberal Education Core


For B.S.

Writing: (3)

Choose one of the following:

Humanities and Values: (9)

All courses taken from either the Humanities Common or Broad Core.

Social Sciences and History: (9)

  • 3 hours must be a history course chosen from the Social Science Core
  • The remaining 6 hours must be taken from courses listed on the Social Science Core.
Biological and Physical Sciences: (7)

Computer Skills:

See explanation of Computer Skills below.

Diverse Cultures/Global Perspectives: (3)

Senior Capstone Experience: (3)

Note

All B.S. programs require 6 credit hours of upper division general education. Those requirements are satisfied by completing the following:

  • A 300-level Human Issues and Dilemmas course
    This requirement can be fulfilled by choosing a Human Issues and Dilemmas course from one of the three distribution categories listed above: Humanities and Values; Social Sciences and History; or Biological and Physical Sciences.
  • Senior Capstone Experience
Total Credit Hours for B.S. (45-46)

For B.A.

Writing: (3)

Choose one of the following:

Humanities and Values: (9)

All courses taken from either the Humanities Common or Broad Core.

Foreign Language: (8)

  • 8 hours of intermediate language in the same language. May be completed during the A.A. level course work.
Social Sciences and History: (9)

  • 3 hours must be a history course chosen from the Social Science Core
  • The remaining 6 hours must be taken from courses listed on the Social Science Core.
Biological and Physical Sciences: (7)

Computer Skills:

  • See explanation of Computer Skills below.
Diverse Cultures/Global Perspectives: (3)

Senior Capstone Experience: (3)

Note

All B.A. programs require 6 credit hours of upper division general education. Those requirements are satisfied by completing the following:

  • A 300-level Human Issues and Dilemmas course
    This requirement can be fulfilled by choosing a Human Issues and Dilemmas course from one of the three distribution categories listed above: Humanities and Values; Social Sciences and History; or Biological and Physical Sciences.
  • Senior Capstone Experience
Total Credit Hours for B.A. (53-54)

Major Program


Specialization Courses

 All other courses as determined and prescribed by the program.

Human Issues and Dilemmas Course Requirement


Human Issues and Dilemmas Courses are 300-level Humanities and Values; Social Sciences and History; or Biological and Physical Sciences courses intended to advance students’ abilities to understand and address the complexities of human life. The courses will actively engage students in discussion and treatment of the dilemmas that arise when issues are considered from multidisciplinary perspectives. The courses will empower students to create knowledge and meaning by identifying issues, synthesizing various perspectives, and determining solutions to dilemmas through both individual evaluation of problems and collaborative efforts with others. As such, these courses will enhance students’ critical thinking, information management, writing, speaking, and collaboration skills.

Capstone Experience Requirement


The Capstone Experience (XXXX 490, Capstone Experience) is a three-credit hour course intended to synthesize and integrate the knowledge and skills of the major course work and the general and liberal education course work. Students will be required to complete a major research project aimed at addressing a philosophic, social, political, economic, or historical problem connected to their major field of study. Activities in the course will include a major research paper and an oral presentation based on significant research and project results. These activities will be opportunities for students to display the content knowledge, research skills, critical thinking, affective learning, and presentation skills needed to be life-long learners.

The course will require a major research project (the length will need to be determined, but the major paper should be nothing less than 10 pages and probably should be closer to 15-20, minimum), oral summary presentation of the results of the project, extensive reading and/or research, critical thinking, and possibly experiential learning as part of the projects designed with input from the students involved in the course. Additionally, the courses should be less focused on delivering new information than synthesizing and integrating knowledge and skills, and the projects should include some effort to deal with social, philosophic, economic, political or historical problems and issues related to or raised by the content of the major field of study. As such, the courses could conceivably be used as assessment of major program and general/liberal education learning, and could be used to assess student preparedness for employment.

The texts used for the courses will be more “philosophic” in nature, intended to acquaint students with the problems related to the major field, rather than being texts used to expose students to new areas of technical learning.

General Education: Basic Skills Core


The general education core at Vincennes University includes those courses that are designed to develop a common set of basic skills competencies for all students pursuing a baccalaureate or an associate degree. All students are required to demonstrate a minimum level of competence in all of the general education core areas, as described below, as a condition of fulfilling the requirements for the A.A., A.S., A.A.S., and the B.A. or B.S. degrees. Students are not exempt from general education requirements based on national standardized aptitude test scores (SAT, ACT) or placement exam scores, such as CPT, COMPASS, or ASSET. The common core areas and the criteria for achievement are established as follows.

Reading, Writing and Speaking Intensive courses are indicated in the course description section of this catalog using R, W and S superscripts respectfully. (Academic advisors will have a complete list available for student use.)

Students are responsible for meeting all of their reading, writing, and speaking intensive requirements for graduation. They must be aware that taking classes designated as reading, writing, and/or speaking intensive will satisfy those requirements only under the following conditions: (1) students must have completed all reading requirements, English Composition I (ENGL 101 ) or Rhetoric and Research (ENGL 112 ), and/or a required speech course before taking intensive courses to satisfy intensive requirements, (2) students must successfully complete (C or better) the intensive class in order to receive intensive credit, and (3) students must complete all intensive course assignments in order to successfully complete the course (C or better).

In addition, students should be aware that they may not be enrolled in a reading intensive class without having completed all of their reading requirements. Also, students who have not completed English Composition I (ENGL 101 ) or Rhetoric and Research (ENGL 112 ) and a required speech class might not be prepared for the writing or speaking requirements of the class. These students may enroll in the intensive class, but must obtain instructor permission, on the first day of class, in order to remain enrolled in the course.

Every program includes courses that will satisfy the intensive requirements, and students should complete the requirements using these courses; however, when necessary, other intensive courses may be used to complete the intensive requirements. Only Vincennes University courses designated as intensive since Fall of 1998 will satisfy the intensive requirements described in the Vincennes University catalog. Courses transferred from other institutions or experience-based learning credit courses will not satisfy the intensive credit unless an equivalent intensive experience can be verified. When a student can provide adequate documentation of an equivalent intensive experience, the intensive requirement will be considered met.

  1. READING
    1. In order to demonstrate college level proficiency in reading, the student should:
      1. summarize material accurately and concisely;
      2. interpret subject matter literally and inferentially;
      3. seek and acquire vocabulary through reading; and
      4. seek and understand subject matter pertinent to his or her career.
    2. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Reading for the A.A., A.S., and A.A.S.:
      1. Each student who is a candidate for the A.A., A.S., or A.A.S. degree must demonstrate achievement in reading by satisfying the conditions of either Criterion No. 1, or Criterion No. 2.
      2. The conditions of Criterion No. 1 are:
        1. Placement scores require no developmental/remedial reading upon initial matriculation; and
        2. Earn a C or better in at least one Reading Intensive course.
      3. The conditions of Criterion No. 2 are:
        1. Placement scores require developmental/remedial reading upon initial placement; and
        2. Earn a C or better in READ 009 , READ 011 , READ 103 , OR READ 104  and demonstrate college level reading on a standardized reading test; and
        3. Complete and earn a C or better in at least one Reading Intensive course subsequent to completion of the requirements of 3b.
      4. If and only if, the student has attempted and failed to satisfy the conditions of Criterion No. 1 or No. 2, and student chooses not to repeat those steps, he or she may satisfy the Reading Intensive requirement by achieving a CPT Reading score of 93 or higher prior to graduation.
    3. Criteria for Approval as a Reading Intensive Course:
      1. A Reading Intensive course is one that reinforces the reading skills expected of college students; and
      2. Any course will be approved as Reading Intensive if it meets at least one of the following criteria:
        1. At least twenty percent of a student’s grade is based on reading that is not covered by lecture or study guide. This reading may be part of the text(s) required for the course but not covered by the instructor in class, study guides, or study sessions, or it may be reading that is expected in addition to textbook reading and that is completed independent of normal classroom activities (such as reading expected to make up at least twenty percent of material covered on tests or research papers that constitute at least twenty percent of the course grade), or
        2. Reading is the central activity of the approved course and a student could not pass the course without doing the required reading for the course, as, for example, in the case of Literature courses.
  2. WRITING
    1.  In order to demonstrate college-level proficiency in writing, the student should:
      1. write a document showing a clear purpose, effective organization, adequate supporting details, and using a mechanically correct style;
      2. critically analyze and evaluate his or her own and others’ writing;
      3. appropriately incorporate ideas from outside sources into his or her own words with proper credit given;
      4. be able to write a personal resume.
    2. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Writing for the A.A. and A.S.:
      1. Each student who is a candidate for either the A.A. or A.S. degree must demonstrate achievement in writing by satisfying the conditions of Criterion No. 1. If the student fails to meet these conditions, he/she may then attempt to meet the conditions of Criterion No. 2.
      2. The conditions of Criterion No. 1 are:
        1. Earn a C or better in ENGL 101  and
        2. Earn a passing grade in one of the following: ENGL 102 , ENGL 107 , ENGL 108 , ENGL 109 , or ENGL 205  and
        3. Earn a C or better in a course approved and designated as a Writing Intensive course.
          - or -
        4. Earn a C or better in ENGL 112  and
        5. Earn a C or better in a course approved and designated as a Writing Intensive course.
      3. The conditions of Criterion No. 2 may be met if and only if a student has attempted, but not completed Criterion No. 1 successfully. Criterion No. 2 is as follows: If the student has failed to earn a C or better in any of the approved Writing Intensive courses in his or her major or in the liberal education core and chooses not to repeat that approach, then, prior to graduation, the student must pass a writing test administered by the English Department.
    3. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Writing for the A.A.S:
      1. Each student who is a candidate for the A.A.S. degree must demonstrate achievement in writing by meeting the following criteria:
        1. Earn a C or better in ENGL 101  or ENGL 112 , and
        2. Earn a C or better in an approved Writing Intensive course either in his or her major or the liberal education core, or
        3. If the student fails to earn a C or better in an approved Writing Intensive course and chooses not to attempt that approach again, then the student must, prior to graduation, pass a writing test administered by the English Department.
    4. Criteria for Approval as a Writing Intensive Course.
      1. While it is assumed that students will most often select a Writing Intensive course within their majors, courses identified as meeting the Liberal Education component may also qualify as Writing Intensive. For a course to be designated as a Writing Intensive course, the following criteria must be met.
      2. The course uses writing as one of its tools to promote the learning of course materials.
      3. Assignments involving writing should be given throughout the semester and regular feedback given to the students on ways to improve their writing. At least one of the writing assignments should require a rough draft submitted for comment and returned before the final draft is expected.
      4. Individual writing assignments may vary in scope and length according to the needs of the major or the course. The type of assignment should be determined by the type of writing required for success in advanced study or in the profession. Research papers, summaries, essay exams, lab reports, journals, and other appropriate writing forms may all be used. A minimum of 2000 words, exclusive of rough drafts, for the entire course is expected. At least one writing assignment must require students to use and document outside sources in their writing.
      5. Writing, as described in D.4, above, should be a significant part of the overall course grade. “Significant” is intended to mean one of the following options: (1) Written work will determine at least forty percent of the course grade. (2) If written work will count some percentage less than forty percent, then with revisions, all written work must achieve a passing grade. In the case of option 2, failure to complete writing assignments with an average grade of C or higher will result in failure of the course. It is assumed that instructors will identify, in their syllabi, writing objectives such as the type of writing expected, the number of writing assignments, and the percentage of the grade to be determined by each writing assignment.
      6. Instructors will provide students with criteria used to evaluate their writing. Such criteria must reflect the standards of the profession or discipline.
      7. Instructors will provide assistance to students to help them with their writing – and/or direct them to the resources available on campus to provide additional assistance. This assistance might include the following: sample papers that meet the requirement; group activities that give students feedback on their writing; requiring outlines or rough drafts that are returned with comments before the paper is completed; tutorials in the lab; and individual conferences.
  3. ORAL COMMUNICATION
    1. In order to demonstrate college-level proficiency in oral communication, the student should:
      1. Express him- or herself clearly, using appropriate styles that suit the message, purpose, and context;
      2. Use non-verbal cues which are appropriate to the verbal language;
      3. Actively listen and critically evaluate oral communication;
      4. Seek and acquire vocabulary through speaking and listening.
    2. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Oral communication for the A.A., A.S., and A.A.S.:
      1. Each student who is a candidate for the A.A., A.S., or A.A.S. degree must demonstrate achievement in oral communication by satisfying the conditions of Criterion No. 1 and Criterion No. 2.
      2. The conditions of Criterion No. 1 are: Earn a C or better in SPCH 143  or SPCH 148 
      3. The conditions of Criterion No. 2 are: Earn a C or better in an approved Speaking Intensive course either in the student’s major or on the Liberal Education Core list.
      4. If, and only if, the student has attempted and failed to meet the conditions of Criterion 2 and chooses not to attempt that approach again, then prior to graduation, the student must pass at a seventy percent level, the Personal Report of Communication Apprehension (PRCA) and Speech Comprehension tests administered by the Speech Department.
    3. Criteria for Approval as a Speaking Intensive Course.
      1. A Speaking Intensive course reinforces the oral communication skills beyond normal classroom discussion.
      2. Preferably, but not necessarily, the course occurs within the major and includes one or more of the following types of speaking experiences:
        1. Present one oral report or participate on a symposium or panel discussion.
        2. Deliver an oral presentation of one’s work to peers or deliver oral critiques of others’ work.
        3. Deliver sales presentations.
        4. Participate in and have evaluated oral communication activities such as role-playing or simulations of job-related experiences; i.e., interviews, peer counseling, conducting business meetings, teaching a lesson, explaining processes or procedures, among others.
        5. Engage in some form of persuasion, debate, or argumentation.
    4. Evaluation of Speaking Experiences in a Speaking Intensive Course.
      1. Just as spelling, grammar, sentence structure, and word choice are elements evaluated in written assignments, the types of oral presentations listed above under D are evaluated in the following ways:
        1. Having a clear organization, with an introduction, body, and conclusion.
        2. Supporting contentions with documented evidence.
        3. Using appropriate speaking styles that suit the message, purpose, and context.
        4. Using nonverbal cues which are appropriate to the verbal language.
  4. MATHEMATICS
    1. In order to demonstrate Mathematics proficiency, the student should be able to:
      1. apply a combination of fundamental arithmetic and algebra skills,
      2. apply fundamental geometric spatial skills, and
      3. solve problems using the appropriate skills identified above in both rote and novel situations.
    2.  Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Mathematics for the A.A. or A.S. Degrees:
      Each student who is a candidate for either the A.A. or A.S. degree must demonstrate achievement in mathematics by satisfying the conditions of one of the following criteria.
      1. Earn a C or better in MATH 102 , MATH 103 , MATH 111 , or MATH 112  and pass a departmental exam prior to graduation.
      2. Earn a C or better in MATH 104 , MATH 110 , or MATH 115  or higher.
    3. Criteria for Demonstrating Achievement in Mathematics for the A.A.S. Degree:
      Each student who is a candidate for the A.A.S. degree must demonstrate achievement in mathematics by satisfying the conditions of one of the following criteria.
      1. Earn a C or better in one 100-level MATT course and pass a departmental exam prior to graduation.
      2. Earn a C or better in the Apprenticeship Courses MATA 101 , MATA 102 , MATA 103 , MATA 104 , MATA 105 , and MATA 106 .
      3. Meet one of the criteria for demonstrating achievement in Mathematics for the A.S. degree.

 

Computer Skills


All Vincennes University students should develop the minimum computer skills described in section G of the General Education Skills through a “computers across the curriculum” approach to developing these skills. Beginning in the basic skills courses and continuing through other general education and program course work, students will be expected to develop and apply these skills. In addition, most programs expect majors to enhance their basic computing skills with program-related computer skills. Programs requiring a skills-enhancing course identify those specific requirements on the program pages.

Social Science


Humanities Broad Core


Science and Mathematics Common Core for A.A. and A.S.


Science and Mathematics Broad Core for A.A. and A.S.


Laboratory Sciences


Science and Mathematics Common Core for A.A.S.


Science and Mathematics Broad Core for A.A.S.


Laboratory Sciences


Human Issues and Dilemmas Course List


Reading/Writing/Speaking Intensive Course List